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Associations between birth parameters and skin autofluorescence advanced glycation end and ankle-brachial index in young adulthood : the Malmö Offspring Study

Sharma, Shantanu LU ; Sperling, Johannes LU ; Jujic, Amra LU ; Bennet, Louise LU orcid ; Christensson, Anders LU and Nilsson, Peter M LU (2023) In Journal of Hypertension 41(7). p.1184-1190
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Low birth weight (LBW), advanced glycation end-products (AGE), and ankle-brachial index (ABI) have all been independently associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence is lacking on the effect of LBW on adult AGE, a marker of glucose metabolism, and ABI, a marker of peripheral atherosclerosis. The objective was to study these associations in a population-based cohort.

METHODS: Data from the Malmö Offspring Study, Sweden, were used for 2012 participants (958 men, 1054 women) born between 1973 and 2000, linked to the Medical Birth Register. General linear regression analysis (with β coefficients and 95% confidence intervals) was applied for associations between birth weight and skin auto-fluorescence (sf)AGE... (More)

BACKGROUND: Low birth weight (LBW), advanced glycation end-products (AGE), and ankle-brachial index (ABI) have all been independently associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence is lacking on the effect of LBW on adult AGE, a marker of glucose metabolism, and ABI, a marker of peripheral atherosclerosis. The objective was to study these associations in a population-based cohort.

METHODS: Data from the Malmö Offspring Study, Sweden, were used for 2012 participants (958 men, 1054 women) born between 1973 and 2000, linked to the Medical Birth Register. General linear regression analysis (with β coefficients and 95% confidence intervals) was applied for associations between birth weight and skin auto-fluorescence (sf)AGE as well as mean ABI (right/left), before and after adjusting for gestational age, sex, glucose, lipids, smoking, BMI and SBP.

RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of men was 29.3 (7.3) and of women 28.6 (7.3) years. There was an average 0.054 decrease in sfAGE value per 1 kg increase in birth weight (adjusted for gestational age and sex). Similarly, 1 kg increase in birth weight (adjusted for gestational age and confounders) was associated with an average 0.016 decrease in mean ABI.

CONCLUSION: Birth weight, adjusted for gestational age and other confounding variables, is inversely associated with ABI in young adulthood, an age range when ABI may represent hemodynamic changes more than atherosclerosis, but for sfAGE, the association was attenuated upon further adjustment. These risk markers may, therefore, represent mediating pathways for early life factors affecting cardiovascular risk later in life.

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author
; ; ; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Hypertension
volume
41
issue
7
pages
1184 - 1190
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:85160966442
  • pmid:37115823
ISSN
1473-5598
DOI
10.1097/HJH.0000000000003449
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
Copyright © 2023 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
id
ac8ea0ff-2fae-4ee5-880e-ad2cf4fdc0c8
date added to LUP
2023-05-03 12:54:07
date last changed
2024-06-01 01:41:50
@article{ac8ea0ff-2fae-4ee5-880e-ad2cf4fdc0c8,
  abstract     = {{<p>BACKGROUND: Low birth weight (LBW), advanced glycation end-products (AGE), and ankle-brachial index (ABI) have all been independently associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence is lacking on the effect of LBW on adult AGE, a marker of glucose metabolism, and ABI, a marker of peripheral atherosclerosis. The objective was to study these associations in a population-based cohort.</p><p>METHODS: Data from the Malmö Offspring Study, Sweden, were used for 2012 participants (958 men, 1054 women) born between 1973 and 2000, linked to the Medical Birth Register. General linear regression analysis (with β coefficients and 95% confidence intervals) was applied for associations between birth weight and skin auto-fluorescence (sf)AGE as well as mean ABI (right/left), before and after adjusting for gestational age, sex, glucose, lipids, smoking, BMI and SBP.</p><p>RESULTS: The mean (SD) age of men was 29.3 (7.3) and of women 28.6 (7.3) years. There was an average 0.054 decrease in sfAGE value per 1 kg increase in birth weight (adjusted for gestational age and sex). Similarly, 1 kg increase in birth weight (adjusted for gestational age and confounders) was associated with an average 0.016 decrease in mean ABI.</p><p>CONCLUSION: Birth weight, adjusted for gestational age and other confounding variables, is inversely associated with ABI in young adulthood, an age range when ABI may represent hemodynamic changes more than atherosclerosis, but for sfAGE, the association was attenuated upon further adjustment. These risk markers may, therefore, represent mediating pathways for early life factors affecting cardiovascular risk later in life.</p>}},
  author       = {{Sharma, Shantanu and Sperling, Johannes and Jujic, Amra and Bennet, Louise and Christensson, Anders and Nilsson, Peter M}},
  issn         = {{1473-5598}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  month        = {{04}},
  number       = {{7}},
  pages        = {{1184--1190}},
  publisher    = {{Lippincott Williams & Wilkins}},
  series       = {{Journal of Hypertension}},
  title        = {{Associations between birth parameters and skin autofluorescence advanced glycation end and ankle-brachial index in young adulthood : the Malmö Offspring Study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000003449}},
  doi          = {{10.1097/HJH.0000000000003449}},
  volume       = {{41}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}