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'The clocks that time us'--circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders

Videnovic, Aleksandar; Lazar, Alpar S; Barker, Roger A LU and Overeem, Sebastiaan (2014) In Nature Reviews Neurology 10(12). p.93-683
Abstract

Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep-wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and circadian dysfunction might exacerbate the disease process. The pathophysiology of sleep-wake disturbances in these disorders remains largely unknown, and is presumably multifactorial. Circadian rhythm dysfunction is often observed in patients with Alzheimer disease, in whom it has a major impact on quality of life and represents one of the most important factors leading to institutionalization of patients. Similarly,... (More)

Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep-wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and circadian dysfunction might exacerbate the disease process. The pathophysiology of sleep-wake disturbances in these disorders remains largely unknown, and is presumably multifactorial. Circadian rhythm dysfunction is often observed in patients with Alzheimer disease, in whom it has a major impact on quality of life and represents one of the most important factors leading to institutionalization of patients. Similarly, sleep and circadian problems represent common nonmotor features of Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. Clinical studies and experiments in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have revealed the progressive nature of circadian dysfunction throughout the course of neurodegeneration, and suggest strategies for the restoration of circadian rhythmicity involving behavioural and pharmacological interventions that target the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we discuss the role of the circadian system in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, and outline the implications of disrupted circadian timekeeping in neurodegenerative diseases.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Animals, Circadian Clocks, Humans, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Journal Article, Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review
in
Nature Reviews Neurology
volume
10
issue
12
pages
11 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:84927173786
ISSN
1759-4766
DOI
10.1038/nrneurol.2014.206
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
b19a7be7-f746-4bdd-95a5-62cd0c80a42b
date added to LUP
2016-11-24 15:01:05
date last changed
2017-10-01 05:26:22
@article{b19a7be7-f746-4bdd-95a5-62cd0c80a42b,
  abstract     = {<p>Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep-wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and circadian dysfunction might exacerbate the disease process. The pathophysiology of sleep-wake disturbances in these disorders remains largely unknown, and is presumably multifactorial. Circadian rhythm dysfunction is often observed in patients with Alzheimer disease, in whom it has a major impact on quality of life and represents one of the most important factors leading to institutionalization of patients. Similarly, sleep and circadian problems represent common nonmotor features of Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. Clinical studies and experiments in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have revealed the progressive nature of circadian dysfunction throughout the course of neurodegeneration, and suggest strategies for the restoration of circadian rhythmicity involving behavioural and pharmacological interventions that target the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we discuss the role of the circadian system in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, and outline the implications of disrupted circadian timekeeping in neurodegenerative diseases.</p>},
  author       = {Videnovic, Aleksandar and Lazar, Alpar S and Barker, Roger A and Overeem, Sebastiaan},
  issn         = {1759-4766},
  keyword      = {Animals,Circadian Clocks,Humans,Neurodegenerative Diseases,Journal Article,Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't,Review},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {93--683},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Reviews Neurology},
  title        = {'The clocks that time us'--circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrneurol.2014.206},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2014},
}