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East versus West: Energy Transition and Energy Intensity in Coal-Rich Europe 1830-2000

Nielsen, Hana LU ; Kander, Astrid LU and Warde, Paul (2016) Economic History Society Annual Conference 2016
Abstract
The paper examines energy consumption in Britain, Germany and Czechoslovakia over 130 years, including both traditional and modern energy carriers. The article is based on new series of energy consumption for Czechoslovakia that includes traditional energy sources, and, which is compared to energy use in other coal-rich countries in Europe: Germany and Britain. Changes in energy consumption are decomposed into effects from population growth, economic growth and energy intensity. There are two major findings from the long-run transitions we identify. First, by exploring the coal transition for coal-rich versus coal-poor countries in Europe, we find some remarkable similarities between both Germany and Czechoslovakia. We show that when we... (More)
The paper examines energy consumption in Britain, Germany and Czechoslovakia over 130 years, including both traditional and modern energy carriers. The article is based on new series of energy consumption for Czechoslovakia that includes traditional energy sources, and, which is compared to energy use in other coal-rich countries in Europe: Germany and Britain. Changes in energy consumption are decomposed into effects from population growth, economic growth and energy intensity. There are two major findings from the long-run transitions we identify. First, by exploring the coal transition for coal-rich versus coal-poor countries in Europe, we find some remarkable similarities between both Germany and Czechoslovakia. We show that when we include Germany, England and the Czech Republic there is in an inverted U-curve in energy intensity, even when traditional energy carriers are taken into account, in contrast with results for four coal-poor countries in the Northern and Southern parts of Europe, where energy intensity was either declining or staying fairly constant in the long run. Secondly, the paper identifies a different transition path after the WII, a period in which Czechoslovakia’s energy intensity diverged from the trend observed in previous decades and also in Germany and England. Through a more detailed decomposition of the Czechoslovak energy intensity after 1950, we argue that the rise in energy intensity was a consequence of multiple forces, including high industrial energy use, structural change towards metals and chemicals (the backbone of central planning) and inefficiencies in energy use in those two sectors as well as high transformation losses of the
electricity production. We suggest the central-planning system to be the main driver of this development, but with effects that are particular to some sectors rather than spread across all energy use. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
energy, coal, traditional sources, transition, decomposition analysis, politics
pages
29 pages
conference name
Economic History Society Annual Conference 2016
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b1e9192b-5a6f-419a-a740-2f8a494bdde2
alternative location
http://www.ehs.org.uk/dotAsset/c00ae60d-6536-408c-afea-21f5a7cb1243.pdf
date added to LUP
2017-09-22 14:26:10
date last changed
2017-09-26 10:29:34
@misc{b1e9192b-5a6f-419a-a740-2f8a494bdde2,
  abstract     = {The paper examines energy consumption in Britain, Germany and Czechoslovakia over 130 years, including both traditional and modern energy carriers. The article is based on new series of energy consumption for Czechoslovakia that includes traditional energy sources, and, which is compared to energy use in other coal-rich countries in Europe: Germany and Britain. Changes in energy consumption are decomposed into effects from population growth, economic growth and energy intensity. There are two major findings from the long-run transitions we identify. First, by exploring the coal transition for coal-rich versus coal-poor countries in Europe, we find some remarkable similarities between both Germany and Czechoslovakia. We show that when we include Germany, England and the Czech Republic there is in an inverted U-curve in energy intensity, even when traditional energy carriers are taken into account, in contrast with results for four coal-poor countries in the Northern and Southern parts of Europe, where energy intensity was either declining or staying fairly constant in the long run. Secondly, the paper identifies a different transition path after the WII, a period in which Czechoslovakia’s energy intensity diverged from the trend observed in previous decades and also in Germany and England. Through a more detailed decomposition of the Czechoslovak energy intensity after 1950, we argue that the rise in energy intensity was a consequence of multiple forces, including high industrial energy use, structural change towards metals and chemicals (the backbone of central planning) and inefficiencies in energy use in those two sectors as well as high transformation losses of the<br/>electricity production. We suggest the central-planning system to be the main driver of this development, but with effects that are particular to some sectors rather than spread across all energy use.},
  author       = {Nielsen, Hana and Kander, Astrid and Warde, Paul},
  keyword      = {energy,coal,traditional sources,transition,decomposition analysis,politics},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {29},
  title        = {East versus West: Energy Transition and Energy Intensity in Coal-Rich Europe 1830-2000},
  year         = {2016},
}