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Measurement variability of quantitative sensory testing in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain.

Lindgren, Ingrid LU ; Ekstrand, Elisabeth LU and Brogårdh, Christina LU (2016) In Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 48(5). p.435-441
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the measurement variability of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain.

DESIGN: A test-retest design.

PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three persons with post-stroke shoulder pain (median age 65 years).

METHODS: Thermal detection thresholds (cold and warm), pain thresholds (cold and heat) and mechanical pain thresholds (pressure and pin prick) were assessed twice in both arms, 2–3 weeks apart. Measurement variability was analysed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), the change in mean (đ) with 95% confidence interval (logarithmic scales), and the relative standard error of measurement (SEM%; re-transformed scales).

RESULTS: The ICCs for... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the measurement variability of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain.

DESIGN: A test-retest design.

PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three persons with post-stroke shoulder pain (median age 65 years).

METHODS: Thermal detection thresholds (cold and warm), pain thresholds (cold and heat) and mechanical pain thresholds (pressure and pin prick) were assessed twice in both arms, 2–3 weeks apart. Measurement variability was analysed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), the change in mean (đ) with 95% confidence interval (logarithmic scales), and the relative standard error of measurement (SEM%; re-transformed scales).

RESULTS: The ICCs for thermal thresholds ranged from 0.48 to 0.89 in the affected (painful) arm and from 0.50 to 0.63 in the unaffected arm, and for mechanical pain thresholds from 0.66 to 0.90 in both arms. No systematic changes in the mean (đ) were found. The SEM% ranged from 4% to 10% for thermal detection and heat pain thresholds, and from 17% to 42% for cold pain and mechanical pain thresholds in both arms.

CONCLUSION: QST measurements, especially cold pain thresholds and mechanical pain thresholds, vary in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain. Before QST can be used routinely to evaluate post-stroke shoulder pain, a test protocol with decreased variability needs to be developed
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Physiotherapy, shoulder pain
in
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
48
issue
5
pages
435 - 441
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84964687891
  • wos:000375753300004
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.2340/16501977-2180
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b2a88a4e-bc31-4475-b76e-9951960695b6
date added to LUP
2016-05-24 09:58:56
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:26:53
@article{b2a88a4e-bc31-4475-b76e-9951960695b6,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the measurement variability of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain. <br/><br/>DESIGN: A test-retest design. <br/><br/>PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-three persons with post-stroke shoulder pain (median age 65 years).<br/><br/>METHODS: Thermal detection thresholds (cold and warm), pain thresholds (cold and heat) and mechanical pain thresholds (pressure and pin prick) were assessed twice in both arms, 2–3 weeks apart. Measurement variability was analysed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), the change in mean (đ) with 95% confidence interval (logarithmic scales), and the relative standard error of measurement (SEM%; re-transformed scales). <br/><br/>RESULTS: The ICCs for thermal thresholds ranged from 0.48 to 0.89 in the affected (painful) arm and from 0.50 to 0.63 in the unaffected arm, and for mechanical pain thresholds from 0.66 to 0.90 in both arms. No systematic changes in the mean (đ) were found. The SEM% ranged from 4% to 10% for thermal detection and heat pain thresholds, and from 17% to 42% for cold pain and mechanical pain thresholds in both arms.<br/><br/>CONCLUSION: QST measurements, especially cold pain thresholds and mechanical pain thresholds, vary in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain. Before QST can be used routinely to evaluate post-stroke shoulder pain, a test protocol with decreased variability needs to be developed<br/>},
  author       = {Lindgren, Ingrid and Ekstrand, Elisabeth and Brogårdh, Christina},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  keyword      = {Physiotherapy,shoulder pain},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {435--441},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Measurement variability of quantitative sensory testing in persons with post-stroke shoulder pain.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2180},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2016},
}