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A comprehensive analysis of the androgen receptor gene and risk of breast cancer: results from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

Cox, David G.; Blanche, Helene; Pearce, Celeste L.; Calle, Eugenia E.; Colditz, Graham A.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Amiano, Pilar and Berglund, Göran LU , et al. (2006) In Breast Cancer Research 8(5).
Abstract
Introduction Androgens have been hypothesised to influence risk of breast cancer through several possible mechanisms, including their conversion to estradiol or their binding to the oestrogen receptor and/ or androgen receptor ( AR) in the breast. Here, we report on the results of a large and comprehensive study of the association between genetic variation in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium ( BPC3). Methods The underlying genetic variation was determined by first sequencing the coding regions of the AR gene in a panel of 95 advanced breast cancer cases. Second, a dense set of markers from the public database was genotyped in a panel of 349 healthy women.... (More)
Introduction Androgens have been hypothesised to influence risk of breast cancer through several possible mechanisms, including their conversion to estradiol or their binding to the oestrogen receptor and/ or androgen receptor ( AR) in the breast. Here, we report on the results of a large and comprehensive study of the association between genetic variation in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium ( BPC3). Methods The underlying genetic variation was determined by first sequencing the coding regions of the AR gene in a panel of 95 advanced breast cancer cases. Second, a dense set of markers from the public database was genotyped in a panel of 349 healthy women. The linkage disequilibrium relationships ( blocks) across the gene were then identified, and haplotypetagging single nucleotide polymorphisms ( htSNPs) were selected to capture the common genetic variation across the locus. The htSNPs were then genotyped in the nested breast cancer cases and controls from the Cancer Prevention Study II, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, Multiethnic Cohort, Nurses' Health Study, and Women's Health Study cohorts ( 5,603 breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls). Results We found no association between any genetic variation ( SNP, haplotype, or the exon 1 CAG repeat) in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer, nor were any statistical interactions with known breast cancer risk factors observed. Conclusion Among postmenopausal Caucasian women, common variants of the AR gene are not associated with risk of breast cancer. (Less)
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@article{b426df01-b3e5-4084-b627-fee7e1bb66f9,
  abstract     = {Introduction Androgens have been hypothesised to influence risk of breast cancer through several possible mechanisms, including their conversion to estradiol or their binding to the oestrogen receptor and/ or androgen receptor ( AR) in the breast. Here, we report on the results of a large and comprehensive study of the association between genetic variation in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium ( BPC3). Methods The underlying genetic variation was determined by first sequencing the coding regions of the AR gene in a panel of 95 advanced breast cancer cases. Second, a dense set of markers from the public database was genotyped in a panel of 349 healthy women. The linkage disequilibrium relationships ( blocks) across the gene were then identified, and haplotypetagging single nucleotide polymorphisms ( htSNPs) were selected to capture the common genetic variation across the locus. The htSNPs were then genotyped in the nested breast cancer cases and controls from the Cancer Prevention Study II, European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, Multiethnic Cohort, Nurses' Health Study, and Women's Health Study cohorts ( 5,603 breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls). Results We found no association between any genetic variation ( SNP, haplotype, or the exon 1 CAG repeat) in the AR gene and risk of breast cancer, nor were any statistical interactions with known breast cancer risk factors observed. Conclusion Among postmenopausal Caucasian women, common variants of the AR gene are not associated with risk of breast cancer.},
  author       = {Cox, David G. and Blanche, Helene and Pearce, Celeste L. and Calle, Eugenia E. and Colditz, Graham A. and Pike, Malcolm C. and Albanes, Demetrius and Allen, Naomi E. and Amiano, Pilar and Berglund, Göran and Boeing, Heiner and Buring, Julie and Burtt, Noel and Canzian, Federico and Chanock, Stephen and Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise and Feigelson, Heather Spencer and Freedman, Matthew and Haiman, Christopher A. and Hankinson, Susan E. and Henderson, Brian E. and Hoover, Robert and Hunter, David J. and Kaaks, Rudolf and Kolonel, Laurence and Kraft, Peter and LeMarchand, Loic and Lund, Eiliv and Palli, Domenico and Peeters, Petra H. M. and Riboli, Elio and Stram, Daniel O. and Thun, Michael and Tjonneland, Anne and Trichopoulos, Dimitrios and Yeager, Meredith},
  issn         = {1465-5411},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Breast Cancer Research},
  title        = {A comprehensive analysis of the androgen receptor gene and risk of breast cancer: results from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/bcr1602},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2006},
}