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Family history of diabetes and its relationship with insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes : a population-based cohort study

Bennet, Louise LU ; Franks, Paul W. LU ; Zöller, Bengt LU and Groop, Leif LU (2017) In Acta Diabetologica p.1-10
Abstract

Aims: Middle Eastern immigrants to western countries are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the heritability and impact of first-degree family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes on insulin secretion and action have not been adequately described. Methods: Citizens of Malmö, Sweden, aged 30–75 years born in Iraq or Sweden were invited to participate in this population-based study. Insulin secretion (corrected insulin response and oral disposition index) and action (insulin sensitivity index) were assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests. Results: In total, 45.7% of Iraqis (616/1348) and 27.4% of native Swedes (201/733) had FH in parent(s), sibling(s) or single parent and sibling, i.e., FH+. Approximately 8% of Iraqis and... (More)

Aims: Middle Eastern immigrants to western countries are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the heritability and impact of first-degree family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes on insulin secretion and action have not been adequately described. Methods: Citizens of Malmö, Sweden, aged 30–75 years born in Iraq or Sweden were invited to participate in this population-based study. Insulin secretion (corrected insulin response and oral disposition index) and action (insulin sensitivity index) were assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests. Results: In total, 45.7% of Iraqis (616/1348) and 27.4% of native Swedes (201/733) had FH in parent(s), sibling(s) or single parent and sibling, i.e., FH+. Approximately 8% of Iraqis and 0.7% of Swedes had ≥ 3 sibling(s) and parent(s) with diabetes, i.e., FH++. Irrespective of family size, prediabetes and diabetes increased with family burden (FH− 29.4%; FH+ 38.8%; FH++ 61.7%) without significant differences across ethnicities. With increasing level of family burden, insulin secretion rather than insulin action decreased. Individuals with a combination of ≥ 3 siblings and parents with diabetes presented with the lowest levels of insulin secretion. Conclusions: The Iraqi immigrant population often present with a strong familial burden of type 2 diabetes with the worst glycemic control and highest diabetes risk in individuals with ≥ 3 siblings and parents with diabetes. Our data show that in a population still free from diabetes familial burden influences insulin secretion to a higher degree than insulin action and may be a logical target for intervention.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Family history of diabetes, Insulin action, Insulin secretion, Middle East, Type 2 diabetes
in
Acta Diabetologica
pages
10 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85038814643
ISSN
0940-5429
DOI
10.1007/s00592-017-1088-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b47cd931-fea5-4f77-878a-3fcd241acaa3
date added to LUP
2018-01-02 15:26:31
date last changed
2018-11-21 21:36:58
@article{b47cd931-fea5-4f77-878a-3fcd241acaa3,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims: Middle Eastern immigrants to western countries are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the heritability and impact of first-degree family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes on insulin secretion and action have not been adequately described. Methods: Citizens of Malmö, Sweden, aged 30–75 years born in Iraq or Sweden were invited to participate in this population-based study. Insulin secretion (corrected insulin response and oral disposition index) and action (insulin sensitivity index) were assessed by oral glucose tolerance tests. Results: In total, 45.7% of Iraqis (616/1348) and 27.4% of native Swedes (201/733) had FH in parent(s), sibling(s) or single parent and sibling, i.e., FH+. Approximately 8% of Iraqis and 0.7% of Swedes had ≥ 3 sibling(s) and parent(s) with diabetes, i.e., FH++. Irrespective of family size, prediabetes and diabetes increased with family burden (FH− 29.4%; FH+ 38.8%; FH++ 61.7%) without significant differences across ethnicities. With increasing level of family burden, insulin secretion rather than insulin action decreased. Individuals with a combination of ≥ 3 siblings and parents with diabetes presented with the lowest levels of insulin secretion. Conclusions: The Iraqi immigrant population often present with a strong familial burden of type 2 diabetes with the worst glycemic control and highest diabetes risk in individuals with ≥ 3 siblings and parents with diabetes. Our data show that in a population still free from diabetes familial burden influences insulin secretion to a higher degree than insulin action and may be a logical target for intervention.</p>},
  author       = {Bennet, Louise and Franks, Paul W. and Zöller, Bengt and Groop, Leif},
  issn         = {0940-5429},
  keyword      = {Family history of diabetes,Insulin action,Insulin secretion,Middle East,Type 2 diabetes},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  pages        = {1--10},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Acta Diabetologica},
  title        = {Family history of diabetes and its relationship with insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes : a population-based cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00592-017-1088-5},
  year         = {2017},
}