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The association between early-life relative telomere length and childhood neurodevelopment

Feiler, Marina Oktapodas; Patel, Deven; Li, Huiqi LU ; Meacham, Philip J.; Watson, Gene E.; Shamlaye, Conrad; Yeates, Alison; Broberg, Karin LU and van Wijngaarden, Edwin (2018) In NeuroToxicology 65. p.22-27
Abstract

Purpose: To examine the association between telomere length and neurodevelopment in children. Methods: We examined the relationship between relative telomere length (rTL) and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 9 and 30 months, and 5 years of age in children enrolled in the Seychelles Child Development Study Nutrition Cohort 1 (NC1). Relative telomere length was measured in cord blood and in child blood at age five. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and rTL adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Mean rTL was 1.18 at birth and 0.71 at age five. Increased cord blood rTL was associated with better scores on two neurodevelopmental tests, the psychomotor developmental index (β = 4.01;... (More)

Purpose: To examine the association between telomere length and neurodevelopment in children. Methods: We examined the relationship between relative telomere length (rTL) and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 9 and 30 months, and 5 years of age in children enrolled in the Seychelles Child Development Study Nutrition Cohort 1 (NC1). Relative telomere length was measured in cord blood and in child blood at age five. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and rTL adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Mean rTL was 1.18 at birth and 0.71 at age five. Increased cord blood rTL was associated with better scores on two neurodevelopmental tests, the psychomotor developmental index (β = 4.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.17, 7.85) at age 30 months, and the Woodcock Johnson test of achievement letter-word score (β = 2.88; CI = 1.21–4.56) at age five. The Woodcock Johnson test of achievement letter-word score remained statistically significant after two outliers were excluded (β = 2.83; CI = 0.69, 4.97); the psychomotor developmental index did not (β = 3.62; CI = −1.28, 8.52). None of the neurodevelopmental outcomes at age five were associated with five-year rTL. Conclusion: Although increased cord blood rTL was associated with better test scores for a few neurodevelopmental outcomes, this study found little consistent evidence of an association between rTL and neurodevelopment. Future studies with a larger sample size, longer follow-up, and other relevant biological markers (e.g. oxidative stress) are needed to clarify the role of rTL in neurodevelopment and its relevance as a potential surrogate measure for oxidative stress in the field of developmental neurotoxicity.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Children, Cognition, Epidemiology, Language
in
NeuroToxicology
volume
65
pages
6 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85041598263
ISSN
0161-813X
DOI
10.1016/j.neuro.2018.01.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b4e3f519-4f47-4cfd-9473-bac086ce9810
date added to LUP
2018-02-20 12:52:39
date last changed
2018-05-29 11:14:40
@article{b4e3f519-4f47-4cfd-9473-bac086ce9810,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: To examine the association between telomere length and neurodevelopment in children. Methods: We examined the relationship between relative telomere length (rTL) and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 9 and 30 months, and 5 years of age in children enrolled in the Seychelles Child Development Study Nutrition Cohort 1 (NC1). Relative telomere length was measured in cord blood and in child blood at age five. Multivariable linear regression examined associations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and rTL adjusting for relevant covariates. Results: Mean rTL was 1.18 at birth and 0.71 at age five. Increased cord blood rTL was associated with better scores on two neurodevelopmental tests, the psychomotor developmental index (β = 4.01; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.17, 7.85) at age 30 months, and the Woodcock Johnson test of achievement letter-word score (β = 2.88; CI = 1.21–4.56) at age five. The Woodcock Johnson test of achievement letter-word score remained statistically significant after two outliers were excluded (β = 2.83; CI = 0.69, 4.97); the psychomotor developmental index did not (β = 3.62; CI = −1.28, 8.52). None of the neurodevelopmental outcomes at age five were associated with five-year rTL. Conclusion: Although increased cord blood rTL was associated with better test scores for a few neurodevelopmental outcomes, this study found little consistent evidence of an association between rTL and neurodevelopment. Future studies with a larger sample size, longer follow-up, and other relevant biological markers (e.g. oxidative stress) are needed to clarify the role of rTL in neurodevelopment and its relevance as a potential surrogate measure for oxidative stress in the field of developmental neurotoxicity.</p>},
  author       = {Feiler, Marina Oktapodas and Patel, Deven and Li, Huiqi and Meacham, Philip J. and Watson, Gene E. and Shamlaye, Conrad and Yeates, Alison and Broberg, Karin and van Wijngaarden, Edwin},
  issn         = {0161-813X},
  keyword      = {Children,Cognition,Epidemiology,Language},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {22--27},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {NeuroToxicology},
  title        = {The association between early-life relative telomere length and childhood neurodevelopment},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2018.01.005},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2018},
}