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Differentiation in putative male sex pheromone components across and within populations of the African butterfly Bicyclus anynana as a potential driver of reproductive isolation

Bacquet, Paul M B; de Jong, Maaike A; Brattström, Oskar LU ; Wang, Hong-Lei LU ; Molleman, Freerk; Heuskin, Stéphanie; Lognay, George; Löfstedt, Christer LU ; Brakefield, Paul M and Vanderpoorten, Alain, et al. (2016) In Ecology and Evolution 6(17). p.6064-6084
Abstract
Sexual traits are often the most divergent characters among closely related species,
suggesting an important role of sexual traits in speciation. However, to
prove this, we need to show that sexual trait differences accumulate before or
during the speciation process, rather than being a consequence of it. Here, we
contrast patterns of divergence among putative male sex pheromone (pMSP)
composition and the genetic structure inferred from variation in the mitochondrial
cytochrome oxidase 1 and nuclear CAD loci in the African butterfly Bicyclus
anynana (Butler, 1879) to determine whether the evolution of
“pheromonal dialects” occurs before or after the differentiation process. We
observed differences in... (More)
Sexual traits are often the most divergent characters among closely related species,
suggesting an important role of sexual traits in speciation. However, to
prove this, we need to show that sexual trait differences accumulate before or
during the speciation process, rather than being a consequence of it. Here, we
contrast patterns of divergence among putative male sex pheromone (pMSP)
composition and the genetic structure inferred from variation in the mitochondrial
cytochrome oxidase 1 and nuclear CAD loci in the African butterfly Bicyclus
anynana (Butler, 1879) to determine whether the evolution of
“pheromonal dialects” occurs before or after the differentiation process. We
observed differences in abundance of some shared pMSP components as well as
differences in the composition of the pMSP among B. anynana populations. In
addition, B. anynana individuals from Kenya displayed differences in the pMSP
composition within a single population that appeared not associated with
genetic differences. These differences in pMSP composition both between and
within B. anynana populations were as large as those found between different
Bicyclus species. Our results suggest that “pheromonal dialects” evolved within
and among populations of B. anynana and may therefore act as precursors of
an ongoing speciation process. (Less)
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Lepidoptera, male sex pheromone, mitochondrial introgression, population divergence, reproductive isolation, speciation
in
Ecology and Evolution
volume
6
issue
17
pages
21 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:84986243143
  • scopus:84986243143
ISSN
2045-7758
DOI
10.1002/ece3.2298http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2298
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b5cc9a37-d8eb-4f9b-ba33-af5894325c53
date added to LUP
2016-09-21 18:13:15
date last changed
2017-05-29 14:52:34
@article{b5cc9a37-d8eb-4f9b-ba33-af5894325c53,
  abstract     = {Sexual traits are often the most divergent characters among closely related species,<br/>suggesting an important role of sexual traits in speciation. However, to<br/>prove this, we need to show that sexual trait differences accumulate before or<br/>during the speciation process, rather than being a consequence of it. Here, we<br/>contrast patterns of divergence among putative male sex pheromone (pMSP)<br/>composition and the genetic structure inferred from variation in the mitochondrial<br/>cytochrome oxidase 1 and nuclear CAD loci in the African butterfly Bicyclus<br/>anynana (Butler, 1879) to determine whether the evolution of<br/>“pheromonal dialects” occurs before or after the differentiation process. We<br/>observed differences in abundance of some shared pMSP components as well as<br/>differences in the composition of the pMSP among B. anynana populations. In<br/>addition, B. anynana individuals from Kenya displayed differences in the pMSP<br/>composition within a single population that appeared not associated with<br/>genetic differences. These differences in pMSP composition both between and<br/>within B. anynana populations were as large as those found between different<br/>Bicyclus species. Our results suggest that “pheromonal dialects” evolved within<br/>and among populations of B. anynana and may therefore act as precursors of<br/>an ongoing speciation process.},
  author       = {Bacquet, Paul M B and de Jong, Maaike A and Brattström, Oskar and Wang, Hong-Lei and Molleman, Freerk and Heuskin, Stéphanie and Lognay, George and Löfstedt, Christer and Brakefield, Paul M and Vanderpoorten, Alain and Nieberding, Caroline M},
  issn         = {2045-7758},
  keyword      = {Lepidoptera,male sex pheromone,mitochondrial introgression,population divergence,reproductive isolation,speciation},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {17},
  pages        = {6064--6084},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Ecology and Evolution},
  title        = {Differentiation in putative male sex pheromone components across and within populations of the African butterfly <i>Bicyclus anynana</i> as a potential driver of reproductive isolation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2298http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2298},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2016},
}