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A 6-Week Web-Based osteoarthritis treatment program : Observational quasi-experimental study

Nero, Håkan LU ; Dahlberg, Jakob and Dahlberg, Leif E. LU (2017) In Journal of Medical Internet Research 19(12).
Abstract

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, with a burden of disease estimated to increase over time. Joint Academy, a Web-based treatment for individuals with clinically verified knee or hip OA, was developed to increase access to and facilitate implementation of evidence-based nonsurgical OA treatment in accordance with international guidelines. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate joint pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time of users of the Joint Academy program. Methods: We enrolled 350 patients who were recruited online and completed the initial health journal in the 6-week program. We asked patients to complete an eHealth journal and... (More)

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, with a burden of disease estimated to increase over time. Joint Academy, a Web-based treatment for individuals with clinically verified knee or hip OA, was developed to increase access to and facilitate implementation of evidence-based nonsurgical OA treatment in accordance with international guidelines. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate joint pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time of users of the Joint Academy program. Methods: We enrolled 350 patients who were recruited online and completed the initial health journal in the 6-week program. We asked patients to complete an eHealth journal and e-questionnaires, including pain level assessed by a numerical rating scale, as well as a physical function evaluation using the 30-second chair-stand test. In addition, we assessed HRQoL using the 3-level version of the EQ-5D. We also asked participants whether they experienced difficulty walking and were afraid of physical activity due to their OA and their desire for surgery. We collected descriptive data and compared pre-versus postintervention data. As a reference group, we included results retrieved from the Swedish well-structured face-to-face self-supportive OA management program Better Management of Patients With Osteoarthritis (BOA). Results: Of the study cohort (n=350 patients; 239 women, mean age 62 years, mean body mass index 27 kg/m2), 71.4% (n=250) completed the program and were included in the study. We used the questionnaires to secure a clinical diagnosis of OA and to establish baseline study values. After 6 weeks of treatment, the change in mean numerical rating scale was larger than the minimal clinical difference (5.4 vs 4.1; P<.001), while physical function increased (from 10.88 to 13.14; P<.001). The percentage of participants having walking difficulties decreased from 81.7% (196/240) to 62.1% (149/240; P<.001), those afraid of being physically active decreased from 22.1% (53/240) to 6.7% (16/240; P<.001), and 22.0% (55/250) reported that they had reduced the amount of OA-related medication. After 6 weeks, 24% (13/54) of those desiring surgery at the start of the program were no longer interested. In addition, the comparison between Joint Academy and the BOA program showed similar levels of pain at 3 months, but suggested greater reduction with the use of Joint Academy due to a higher level of pain at baseline. Conclusions: The reported data suggest that participation in Joint Academy is associated with a clinically relevant decrease in pain and an increase in physical function and HRQoL, as well as a decreasing fear of physical activity. This innovative Web-based OA treatment is scalable, is population specific, and can reach a large number of individuals with impaired joints who have Internet access.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Digital Treatment, Ehealth, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Physical Function, Telemedicine
in
Journal of Medical Internet Research
volume
19
issue
12
publisher
Journal of Medical Internet Research
external identifiers
  • scopus:85038924436
ISSN
1438-8871
DOI
10.2196/jmir.9255
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b69e1a1e-a5de-4be3-bfd6-e27825b6a6a3
date added to LUP
2018-01-22 16:36:15
date last changed
2018-07-01 04:52:15
@article{b69e1a1e-a5de-4be3-bfd6-e27825b6a6a3,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of disability, with a burden of disease estimated to increase over time. Joint Academy, a Web-based treatment for individuals with clinically verified knee or hip OA, was developed to increase access to and facilitate implementation of evidence-based nonsurgical OA treatment in accordance with international guidelines. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate joint pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time of users of the Joint Academy program. Methods: We enrolled 350 patients who were recruited online and completed the initial health journal in the 6-week program. We asked patients to complete an eHealth journal and e-questionnaires, including pain level assessed by a numerical rating scale, as well as a physical function evaluation using the 30-second chair-stand test. In addition, we assessed HRQoL using the 3-level version of the EQ-5D. We also asked participants whether they experienced difficulty walking and were afraid of physical activity due to their OA and their desire for surgery. We collected descriptive data and compared pre-versus postintervention data. As a reference group, we included results retrieved from the Swedish well-structured face-to-face self-supportive OA management program Better Management of Patients With Osteoarthritis (BOA). Results: Of the study cohort (n=350 patients; 239 women, mean age 62 years, mean body mass index 27 kg/m2), 71.4% (n=250) completed the program and were included in the study. We used the questionnaires to secure a clinical diagnosis of OA and to establish baseline study values. After 6 weeks of treatment, the change in mean numerical rating scale was larger than the minimal clinical difference (5.4 vs 4.1; P&lt;.001), while physical function increased (from 10.88 to 13.14; P&lt;.001). The percentage of participants having walking difficulties decreased from 81.7% (196/240) to 62.1% (149/240; P&lt;.001), those afraid of being physically active decreased from 22.1% (53/240) to 6.7% (16/240; P&lt;.001), and 22.0% (55/250) reported that they had reduced the amount of OA-related medication. After 6 weeks, 24% (13/54) of those desiring surgery at the start of the program were no longer interested. In addition, the comparison between Joint Academy and the BOA program showed similar levels of pain at 3 months, but suggested greater reduction with the use of Joint Academy due to a higher level of pain at baseline. Conclusions: The reported data suggest that participation in Joint Academy is associated with a clinically relevant decrease in pain and an increase in physical function and HRQoL, as well as a decreasing fear of physical activity. This innovative Web-based OA treatment is scalable, is population specific, and can reach a large number of individuals with impaired joints who have Internet access.</p>},
  articleno    = {e422},
  author       = {Nero, Håkan and Dahlberg, Jakob and Dahlberg, Leif E.},
  issn         = {1438-8871},
  keyword      = {Digital Treatment,Ehealth,Osteoarthritis,Pain,Physical Function,Telemedicine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  publisher    = {Journal of Medical Internet Research},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Internet Research},
  title        = {A 6-Week Web-Based osteoarthritis treatment program : Observational quasi-experimental study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/jmir.9255},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2017},
}