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Sustainable care for children with cancer : a Lancet Oncology Commission

Atun, Rifat ; Bhakta, Nickhill ; Denburg, Avram ; Frazier, A. Lindsay ; Friedrich, Paola ; Gupta, Sumit ; Lam, Catherine G. ; Ward, Zachary J. ; Yeh, Jennifer M. and Allemani, Claudia , et al. (2020) In The Lancet Oncology 21(4). p.185-224
Abstract

We estimate that there will be 13·7 million new cases of childhood cancer globally between 2020 and 2050. At current levels of health system performance (including access and referral), 6·1 million (44·9%) of these children will be undiagnosed. Between 2020 and 2050, 11·1 million children will die from cancer if no additional investments are made to improve access to health-care services or childhood cancer treatment. Of this total, 9·3 million children (84·1%) will be in low-income and lower-middle-income countries. This burden could be vastly reduced with new funding to scale up cost-effective interventions. Simultaneous comprehensive scale-up of interventions could avert 6·2 million deaths in children with cancer in this period, more... (More)

We estimate that there will be 13·7 million new cases of childhood cancer globally between 2020 and 2050. At current levels of health system performance (including access and referral), 6·1 million (44·9%) of these children will be undiagnosed. Between 2020 and 2050, 11·1 million children will die from cancer if no additional investments are made to improve access to health-care services or childhood cancer treatment. Of this total, 9·3 million children (84·1%) will be in low-income and lower-middle-income countries. This burden could be vastly reduced with new funding to scale up cost-effective interventions. Simultaneous comprehensive scale-up of interventions could avert 6·2 million deaths in children with cancer in this period, more than half (56·1%) of the total number of deaths otherwise projected. Taking excess mortality risk into consideration, this reduction in the number of deaths is projected to produce a gain of 318 million life-years. In addition, the global lifetime productivity gains of US$2580 billion in 2020–50 would be four times greater than the cumulative treatment costs of $594 billion, producing a net benefit of $1986 billion on the global investment: a net return of $3 for every $1 invested. In sum, the burden of childhood cancer, which has been grossly underestimated in the past, can be effectively diminished to realise massive health and economic benefits and to avert millions of needless deaths.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Lancet Oncology
volume
21
issue
4
pages
185 - 224
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85082505193
  • pmid:32240612
ISSN
1470-2045
DOI
10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30022-X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b772ac1e-0b26-4b95-a300-724d6e3a85a8
date added to LUP
2020-04-17 16:05:20
date last changed
2021-05-05 01:53:45
@article{b772ac1e-0b26-4b95-a300-724d6e3a85a8,
  abstract     = {<p>We estimate that there will be 13·7 million new cases of childhood cancer globally between 2020 and 2050. At current levels of health system performance (including access and referral), 6·1 million (44·9%) of these children will be undiagnosed. Between 2020 and 2050, 11·1 million children will die from cancer if no additional investments are made to improve access to health-care services or childhood cancer treatment. Of this total, 9·3 million children (84·1%) will be in low-income and lower-middle-income countries. This burden could be vastly reduced with new funding to scale up cost-effective interventions. Simultaneous comprehensive scale-up of interventions could avert 6·2 million deaths in children with cancer in this period, more than half (56·1%) of the total number of deaths otherwise projected. Taking excess mortality risk into consideration, this reduction in the number of deaths is projected to produce a gain of 318 million life-years. In addition, the global lifetime productivity gains of US$2580 billion in 2020–50 would be four times greater than the cumulative treatment costs of $594 billion, producing a net benefit of $1986 billion on the global investment: a net return of $3 for every $1 invested. In sum, the burden of childhood cancer, which has been grossly underestimated in the past, can be effectively diminished to realise massive health and economic benefits and to avert millions of needless deaths.</p>},
  author       = {Atun, Rifat and Bhakta, Nickhill and Denburg, Avram and Frazier, A. Lindsay and Friedrich, Paola and Gupta, Sumit and Lam, Catherine G. and Ward, Zachary J. and Yeh, Jennifer M. and Allemani, Claudia and Coleman, Michel P. and Di Carlo, Veronica and Loucaides, Eva and Fitchett, Elizabeth and Girardi, Fabio and Horton, Susan E. and Bray, Freddie and Steliarova-Foucher, Eva and Sullivan, Richard and Aitken, Joanne F. and Banavali, Shripad and Binagwaho, Agnes and Alcasabas, Patricia and Antillon, Federico and Arora, Ramandeep S. and Barr, Ronald D. and Bouffet, Eric and Challinor, Julia and Fuentes-Alabi, Soad and Gross, Thomas and Hagander, Lars and Hoffman, Ruth I. and Herrera, Cristian and Kutluk, Tezer and Marcus, Karen J. and Moreira, Claude and Pritchard-Jones, Kathy and Ramirez, Oscar and Renner, Lorna and Robison, Leslie L. and Shalkow, Jaime and Sung, Lillian and Yeoh, Allen and Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos},
  issn         = {1470-2045},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {185--224},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {The Lancet Oncology},
  title        = {Sustainable care for children with cancer : a Lancet Oncology Commission},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30022-X},
  doi          = {10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30022-X},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2020},
}