Advanced

The effect of different exercise intensities on health related quality of life in people classified as obese

Svensson, Sara; Eek, Frida LU ; Christiansen, Leif and Wisén, Anita LU (2017) In European Journal of Physiotherapy 19(2). p.104-115
Abstract
Aims: To investigate how training intensity influences HRQoL in people classified as obese, if HRQoL changes are related to changes in weight or aerobic capacity, and to define minimal clinically important difference (MCID).

Methodology: Participants (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) randomized into high-intensity training (n = 49), moderate intensity training (n = 39), or no training (n = 22), completed the SF-36 questionnaire, performed a maximal exercise test, and were weighed, before and after a 16-week intervention.

Major findings: High-intensity training showed a significantly greater increase in Physical Summary Scale (PCS), Physical Functioning (PF) and General Health (GH) compared to control, and in Vitality (VT) compared to... (More)
Aims: To investigate how training intensity influences HRQoL in people classified as obese, if HRQoL changes are related to changes in weight or aerobic capacity, and to define minimal clinically important difference (MCID).

Methodology: Participants (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) randomized into high-intensity training (n = 49), moderate intensity training (n = 39), or no training (n = 22), completed the SF-36 questionnaire, performed a maximal exercise test, and were weighed, before and after a 16-week intervention.

Major findings: High-intensity training showed a significantly greater increase in Physical Summary Scale (PCS), Physical Functioning (PF) and General Health (GH) compared to control, and in Vitality (VT) compared to moderate intensity. Within-group analysis showed that high-intensity training improved PCS 2.0 (0.0–4.4) points (mean (95%CI)), significantly improved mental summary scale (MCS) 3.8 (1.0–6.4) points (mean (95%CI)), PF, GH, VT, mental health, aerobic capacity, and reduced body weight. Moderate intensity training significantly increased PF, GH, aerobic capacity, and reduced weight. No correlations were found between changes in HRQoL and changes in weight or changes in aerobic capacity.

Conclusion: High-intensity training improved HRQoL evaluated with SF-36. HRQoL changes were not correlated with changes in weight or aerobic capacity. Proposed MCIDs are 1.3 points for PCS and 2.0 points for MCS. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Physiotherapy
volume
19
issue
2
pages
12 pages
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • scopus:85014528479
  • wos:000406051700008
ISSN
2167-9177
DOI
10.1080/21679169.2017.1296021
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ba5a61af-90db-4044-a753-da626adecbd9
date added to LUP
2017-02-16 16:08:14
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:50:34
@article{ba5a61af-90db-4044-a753-da626adecbd9,
  abstract     = {Aims: To investigate how training intensity influences HRQoL in people classified as obese, if HRQoL changes are related to changes in weight or aerobic capacity, and to define minimal clinically important difference (MCID).<br/><br/>Methodology: Participants (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) randomized into high-intensity training (n = 49), moderate intensity training (n = 39), or no training (n = 22), completed the SF-36 questionnaire, performed a maximal exercise test, and were weighed, before and after a 16-week intervention.<br/><br/>Major findings: High-intensity training showed a significantly greater increase in Physical Summary Scale (PCS), Physical Functioning (PF) and General Health (GH) compared to control, and in Vitality (VT) compared to moderate intensity. Within-group analysis showed that high-intensity training improved PCS 2.0 (0.0–4.4) points (mean (95%CI)), significantly improved mental summary scale (MCS) 3.8 (1.0–6.4) points (mean (95%CI)), PF, GH, VT, mental health, aerobic capacity, and reduced body weight. Moderate intensity training significantly increased PF, GH, aerobic capacity, and reduced weight. No correlations were found between changes in HRQoL and changes in weight or changes in aerobic capacity.<br/><br/>Conclusion: High-intensity training improved HRQoL evaluated with SF-36. HRQoL changes were not correlated with changes in weight or aerobic capacity. Proposed MCIDs are 1.3 points for PCS and 2.0 points for MCS.},
  author       = {Svensson, Sara and Eek, Frida and Christiansen, Leif and Wisén, Anita},
  issn         = {2167-9177},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {104--115},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {European Journal of Physiotherapy},
  title        = {The effect of different exercise intensities on health related quality of life in people classified as obese},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21679169.2017.1296021},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2017},
}