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Supported employment adapted for people with affective disorders : A randomized controlled trial

Bejerholm, Ulrika LU ; Larsson, Maria E. LU and Johanson, Suzanne LU (2017) In Journal of Affective Disorders 207. p.212-220
Abstract

Background While effective vocational methods for gaining employment exist for people with schizophrenia and similar conditions, no evidence exists with regard to people with affective disorders. We aimed to study the effectiveness of a newly developed Individual Enabling and Support (IES) model adapted for the target group and compared to traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR). Methods An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a parallel design was performed. Sixty-one participants received IES or TVR. The primary outcome was employment rate at 12-month follow-up. Secondary vocational outcomes, depression severity, and quality of life were also studied. Trial register number is ISRCTN93470551. Results IES was more... (More)

Background While effective vocational methods for gaining employment exist for people with schizophrenia and similar conditions, no evidence exists with regard to people with affective disorders. We aimed to study the effectiveness of a newly developed Individual Enabling and Support (IES) model adapted for the target group and compared to traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR). Methods An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a parallel design was performed. Sixty-one participants received IES or TVR. The primary outcome was employment rate at 12-month follow-up. Secondary vocational outcomes, depression severity, and quality of life were also studied. Trial register number is ISRCTN93470551. Results IES was more effective for employment compared to TVR (42.4% vs. 4%; difference 38%, 95% CI 0.12–0.55). Significant group differences were present in secondary vocational outcomes (hours and weeks employed, time to employment), and depression severity. The IES-group had significantly lowering in depression scores and increased quality of life scores during the intervention period. Limitations This RCT was limited by the small sample size due to restriction of recruitment to middle-sized cities within geographically diverse sites in southern Sweden. Larger trials are needed, also in primary health care and employment services settings. Conclusions IES is more effective than TVR for attaining employment and improving depressive symptoms. On a societal level, IES closes the time and service gap between treatment and employment, and thus lowers sick-leave costs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Affective Disorders
volume
207
pages
9 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84991239330
  • wos:000389088600031
ISSN
0165-0327
DOI
10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.028
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bebccc8f-6a6d-41ae-8c27-6859daf61752
date added to LUP
2016-11-02 12:37:40
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:33:10
@article{bebccc8f-6a6d-41ae-8c27-6859daf61752,
  abstract     = {<p>Background While effective vocational methods for gaining employment exist for people with schizophrenia and similar conditions, no evidence exists with regard to people with affective disorders. We aimed to study the effectiveness of a newly developed Individual Enabling and Support (IES) model adapted for the target group and compared to traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR). Methods An assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a parallel design was performed. Sixty-one participants received IES or TVR. The primary outcome was employment rate at 12-month follow-up. Secondary vocational outcomes, depression severity, and quality of life were also studied. Trial register number is ISRCTN93470551. Results IES was more effective for employment compared to TVR (42.4% vs. 4%; difference 38%, 95% CI 0.12–0.55). Significant group differences were present in secondary vocational outcomes (hours and weeks employed, time to employment), and depression severity. The IES-group had significantly lowering in depression scores and increased quality of life scores during the intervention period. Limitations This RCT was limited by the small sample size due to restriction of recruitment to middle-sized cities within geographically diverse sites in southern Sweden. Larger trials are needed, also in primary health care and employment services settings. Conclusions IES is more effective than TVR for attaining employment and improving depressive symptoms. On a societal level, IES closes the time and service gap between treatment and employment, and thus lowers sick-leave costs.</p>},
  author       = {Bejerholm, Ulrika and Larsson, Maria E. and Johanson, Suzanne},
  issn         = {0165-0327},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {212--220},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
  title        = {Supported employment adapted for people with affective disorders : A randomized controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2016.08.028},
  volume       = {207},
  year         = {2017},
}