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Skin exposure to the rubber accelerator diphenylguanidine in medical gloves—An experimental study

Hamnerius, Nils LU ; Pontén, Ann LU ; Björk, Jonas LU ; Persson, Christina LU and Bergendorff, Ola LU (2019) In Contact Dermatitis
Abstract

Background: Dermatitis caused by occupational contact allergy to rubber additives such as diphenylguanidine (DPG) in medical gloves is a hazard for healthcare workers. Both the duration of exposure to medical gloves and the number of gloves used per day vary. The use of alcoholic skin disinfectants before glove donning is mandatory. Objectives: To assess whether skin exposure to the rubber accelerator DPG released from glove material is influenced by alcoholic hand disinfectants, time, and pH. Methods: With the use of ethanol washes, the amount of DPG left on the hands after wearing of gloves for 60 minutes was measured, and comparisons between hands exposed and not exposed to alcoholic disinfectant before glove donning were made. With... (More)

Background: Dermatitis caused by occupational contact allergy to rubber additives such as diphenylguanidine (DPG) in medical gloves is a hazard for healthcare workers. Both the duration of exposure to medical gloves and the number of gloves used per day vary. The use of alcoholic skin disinfectants before glove donning is mandatory. Objectives: To assess whether skin exposure to the rubber accelerator DPG released from glove material is influenced by alcoholic hand disinfectants, time, and pH. Methods: With the use of ethanol washes, the amount of DPG left on the hands after wearing of gloves for 60 minutes was measured, and comparisons between hands exposed and not exposed to alcoholic disinfectant before glove donning were made. With the use of artificial sweat buffered at pH 4, 5, and 6, DPG release from the insides of gloves at different times was measured. Results: The use of alcoholic disinfectant prior to polyisoprene glove donning increased the amount of DPG recovered from the hands. Of the DPG released from polyisoprene gloves into artificial sweat, almost 84% was released within 10 minutes. pH did not influence the rate of release. Conclusions: The use of alcoholic disinfectant increased skin exposure to the rubber accelerator DPG. Even a short duration of use of gloves results in substantial exposure to DPG.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
CAS no. 102-06-7, contact allergy, diphenylguanidine, medical gloves, nitrile rubber, polyisoprene rubber, rubber accelerators, skin exposure
in
Contact Dermatitis
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063150257
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.13238
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf4b7f73-ee16-46ed-9c53-2b707807ae5f
date added to LUP
2019-04-02 12:30:57
date last changed
2019-04-23 04:48:04
@article{bf4b7f73-ee16-46ed-9c53-2b707807ae5f,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Dermatitis caused by occupational contact allergy to rubber additives such as diphenylguanidine (DPG) in medical gloves is a hazard for healthcare workers. Both the duration of exposure to medical gloves and the number of gloves used per day vary. The use of alcoholic skin disinfectants before glove donning is mandatory. Objectives: To assess whether skin exposure to the rubber accelerator DPG released from glove material is influenced by alcoholic hand disinfectants, time, and pH. Methods: With the use of ethanol washes, the amount of DPG left on the hands after wearing of gloves for 60 minutes was measured, and comparisons between hands exposed and not exposed to alcoholic disinfectant before glove donning were made. With the use of artificial sweat buffered at pH 4, 5, and 6, DPG release from the insides of gloves at different times was measured. Results: The use of alcoholic disinfectant prior to polyisoprene glove donning increased the amount of DPG recovered from the hands. Of the DPG released from polyisoprene gloves into artificial sweat, almost 84% was released within 10 minutes. pH did not influence the rate of release. Conclusions: The use of alcoholic disinfectant increased skin exposure to the rubber accelerator DPG. Even a short duration of use of gloves results in substantial exposure to DPG.</p>},
  author       = {Hamnerius, Nils and Pontén, Ann and Björk, Jonas and Persson, Christina and Bergendorff, Ola},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {CAS no. 102-06-7,contact allergy,diphenylguanidine,medical gloves,nitrile rubber,polyisoprene rubber,rubber accelerators,skin exposure},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Skin exposure to the rubber accelerator diphenylguanidine in medical gloves—An experimental study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13238},
  year         = {2019},
}