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Variations in Care Quality Outcomes of Dying People : Latent Class Analysis of an Adult National Register Population

Öhlén, Joakim; Russell, Lara; Håkanson, Cecilia; Alvariza, Anette; Fürst, Carl Johan LU ; Årestedt, Kristofer and Sawatzky, Richard (2017) In Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 53(1). p.13-24
Abstract

Context Symptom relief is a key goal of palliative care. There is a need to consider complexities in symptom relief patterns for groups of people to understand and evaluate symptom relief as an indicator of quality of care at end of life. Objectives The aims of this study were to distinguish classes of patients who have different symptom relief patterns during the last week of life and to identify predictors of these classes in an adult register population. Methods In a cross-sectional retrospective design, data were used from 87,026 decedents with expected deaths registered in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care in 2011 and 2012. Study variables were structured into patient characteristics, and processes and outcomes of quality of... (More)

Context Symptom relief is a key goal of palliative care. There is a need to consider complexities in symptom relief patterns for groups of people to understand and evaluate symptom relief as an indicator of quality of care at end of life. Objectives The aims of this study were to distinguish classes of patients who have different symptom relief patterns during the last week of life and to identify predictors of these classes in an adult register population. Methods In a cross-sectional retrospective design, data were used from 87,026 decedents with expected deaths registered in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care in 2011 and 2012. Study variables were structured into patient characteristics, and processes and outcomes of quality of care. A latent class analysis was used to identify symptom relief patterns. Multivariate multinomial regression analyses were used to identify predictors of class membership. Results Five latent classes were generated: “relieved pain,” “relieved pain and rattles,” “relieved pain and anxiety,” “partly relieved shortness of breath, rattles and anxiety,” and “partly relieved pain, anxiety and confusion.” Important predictors of class membership were age, sex, cause of death, and having someone present at death, individual prescriptions as needed (PRN) and expert consultations. Conclusion Interindividual variability and complexity in symptom relief patterns may inform quality of care and its evaluation for dying people across care settings.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Dying, end of life, palliative care, public health, quality of health care, symptom clusters
in
Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
volume
53
issue
1
pages
12 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85007044938
  • wos:000396502600005
ISSN
0885-3924
DOI
10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.08.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf9039a6-0b75-47fe-8493-bb7a3db4bfac
date added to LUP
2017-01-16 11:30:19
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:45:15
@article{bf9039a6-0b75-47fe-8493-bb7a3db4bfac,
  abstract     = {<p>Context Symptom relief is a key goal of palliative care. There is a need to consider complexities in symptom relief patterns for groups of people to understand and evaluate symptom relief as an indicator of quality of care at end of life. Objectives The aims of this study were to distinguish classes of patients who have different symptom relief patterns during the last week of life and to identify predictors of these classes in an adult register population. Methods In a cross-sectional retrospective design, data were used from 87,026 decedents with expected deaths registered in the Swedish Register of Palliative Care in 2011 and 2012. Study variables were structured into patient characteristics, and processes and outcomes of quality of care. A latent class analysis was used to identify symptom relief patterns. Multivariate multinomial regression analyses were used to identify predictors of class membership. Results Five latent classes were generated: “relieved pain,” “relieved pain and rattles,” “relieved pain and anxiety,” “partly relieved shortness of breath, rattles and anxiety,” and “partly relieved pain, anxiety and confusion.” Important predictors of class membership were age, sex, cause of death, and having someone present at death, individual prescriptions as needed (PRN) and expert consultations. Conclusion Interindividual variability and complexity in symptom relief patterns may inform quality of care and its evaluation for dying people across care settings.</p>},
  author       = {Öhlén, Joakim and Russell, Lara and Håkanson, Cecilia and Alvariza, Anette and Fürst, Carl Johan and Årestedt, Kristofer and Sawatzky, Richard},
  issn         = {0885-3924},
  keyword      = {Dying,end of life,palliative care,public health,quality of health care,symptom clusters},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {01},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {13--24},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Pain and Symptom Management},
  title        = {Variations in Care Quality Outcomes of Dying People : Latent Class Analysis of an Adult National Register Population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2016.08.006},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2017},
}