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Increased incidence of inguinal hernia in offspring of female survivors of childhood central nervous system tumors

Ji, Jianguang LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2018) In International Journal of Cancer 143(3). p.591-596
Abstract

Female survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors experience an increased risk of infertility and various pregnancy complications. We aimed to explore whether the incidence of inguinal hernia could be higher in offspring of female CNS tumor survivors as compared to the general population. Girls who were younger than 15 years of age and diagnosed with CNS tumors between 1958 and 2013 were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry. By linking with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 580 children who were born to mothers of CNS tumor survivors. After 9,662 person-years of follow-up, 23 of them were diagnosed with inguinal hernia, giving an incidence rate (IR) of 2.4 per 1,000 person-years, whereas the IR was... (More)

Female survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors experience an increased risk of infertility and various pregnancy complications. We aimed to explore whether the incidence of inguinal hernia could be higher in offspring of female CNS tumor survivors as compared to the general population. Girls who were younger than 15 years of age and diagnosed with CNS tumors between 1958 and 2013 were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry. By linking with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 580 children who were born to mothers of CNS tumor survivors. After 9,662 person-years of follow-up, 23 of them were diagnosed with inguinal hernia, giving an incidence rate (IR) of 2.4 per 1,000 person-years, whereas the IR was 1.2 for the matched controls. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of inguinal hernia. After adjusting for some confounding factors, the incidence of inguinal hernia was significantly increased with an HR of 1.92 (95%CI 1.08-3.41). The association was predominant in offspring whose mothers were diagnosed with CNS tumors at the age of 10 and older, and with CNS tumors located in the brain.

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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Central Nervous System Neoplasms/complications, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Hernia, Inguinal/epidemiology, Humans, Incidence, Male, Maternal Exposure/adverse effects, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Proportional Hazards Models, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Sweden/epidemiology
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
143
issue
3
pages
6 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043376770
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.31340
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c08e38b9-d9c3-4110-807a-95e6681ad021
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 10:54:19
date last changed
2019-03-19 04:04:44
@article{c08e38b9-d9c3-4110-807a-95e6681ad021,
  abstract     = {<p>Female survivors of childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors experience an increased risk of infertility and various pregnancy complications. We aimed to explore whether the incidence of inguinal hernia could be higher in offspring of female CNS tumor survivors as compared to the general population. Girls who were younger than 15 years of age and diagnosed with CNS tumors between 1958 and 2013 were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry. By linking with the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, we identified 580 children who were born to mothers of CNS tumor survivors. After 9,662 person-years of follow-up, 23 of them were diagnosed with inguinal hernia, giving an incidence rate (IR) of 2.4 per 1,000 person-years, whereas the IR was 1.2 for the matched controls. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of inguinal hernia. After adjusting for some confounding factors, the incidence of inguinal hernia was significantly increased with an HR of 1.92 (95%CI 1.08-3.41). The association was predominant in offspring whose mothers were diagnosed with CNS tumors at the age of 10 and older, and with CNS tumors located in the brain.</p>},
  author       = {Ji, Jianguang and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  keyword      = {Central Nervous System Neoplasms/complications,Child,Child, Preschool,Female,Hernia, Inguinal/epidemiology,Humans,Incidence,Male,Maternal Exposure/adverse effects,Pregnancy,Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects,Proportional Hazards Models,Registries,Retrospective Studies,Sweden/epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {591--596},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Increased incidence of inguinal hernia in offspring of female survivors of childhood central nervous system tumors},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31340},
  volume       = {143},
  year         = {2018},
}