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Life course perspectives on economic stress and generalized trust in other people

Lindström, Martin LU and Rosvall, Maria LU (2016) In The Social Science Journal 53(1). p.7-13
Abstract

The aim is to investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, testing two life course hypotheses. The 2008 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional postal/mail questionnaire study in which 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated (55% participation in the original sample). Logistic regressions were used to analyze associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, adjusting for demographic factors, socioeconomic/occupational status, and emotional and instrumental aspects of social support. A 33.9% proportion of the men and 35.7% of the women reported low trust. Trust was significantly associated... (More)

The aim is to investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, testing two life course hypotheses. The 2008 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional postal/mail questionnaire study in which 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated (55% participation in the original sample). Logistic regressions were used to analyze associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, adjusting for demographic factors, socioeconomic/occupational status, and emotional and instrumental aspects of social support. A 33.9% proportion of the men and 35.7% of the women reported low trust. Trust was significantly associated with all variables included in the models. Economic stress in childhood remained significantly associated with low trust even when economic stress in adulthood was included in the critical period model. s. The critical period hypothesis regarding trust was corroborated in the meaning that economic stress in childhood and adulthood were independently associated with low trust. However, it was not corroborated in the meaning that a specific time window had a particularly high association with trust. The accumulation hypothesis was confirmed: increased combined childhood and adulthood exposure to economic stress was significantly associated with low trust in a cumulative way. Economic stress in childhood may be of importance for trust in others in adulthood.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accumulation, Critical period, Economic stress, Life-course, Social capital, Sweden, Trust
in
The Social Science Journal
volume
53
issue
1
pages
7 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84959532898
  • wos:000371797100002
ISSN
0362-3319
DOI
10.1016/j.soscij.2015.11.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c28a9c96-a94a-4a1a-a9d3-cc573c2553e7
date added to LUP
2016-07-04 09:51:38
date last changed
2017-05-21 04:52:07
@article{c28a9c96-a94a-4a1a-a9d3-cc573c2553e7,
  abstract     = {<p>The aim is to investigate the associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, testing two life course hypotheses. The 2008 public health survey in Scania is a cross-sectional postal/mail questionnaire study in which 28,198 persons aged 18-80 participated (55% participation in the original sample). Logistic regressions were used to analyze associations between economic stress in childhood and adulthood, and low generalized trust in other people, adjusting for demographic factors, socioeconomic/occupational status, and emotional and instrumental aspects of social support. A 33.9% proportion of the men and 35.7% of the women reported low trust. Trust was significantly associated with all variables included in the models. Economic stress in childhood remained significantly associated with low trust even when economic stress in adulthood was included in the critical period model. s. The critical period hypothesis regarding trust was corroborated in the meaning that economic stress in childhood and adulthood were independently associated with low trust. However, it was not corroborated in the meaning that a specific time window had a particularly high association with trust. The accumulation hypothesis was confirmed: increased combined childhood and adulthood exposure to economic stress was significantly associated with low trust in a cumulative way. Economic stress in childhood may be of importance for trust in others in adulthood.</p>},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin and Rosvall, Maria},
  issn         = {0362-3319},
  keyword      = {Accumulation,Critical period,Economic stress,Life-course,Social capital,Sweden,Trust},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {7--13},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {The Social Science Journal},
  title        = {Life course perspectives on economic stress and generalized trust in other people},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soscij.2015.11.006},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2016},
}