Advanced

The Gold Standard Programme: smoking cessation interventions for disadvantaged smokers are effective in a real-life setting

Neumann, Tim LU ; Rasmussen, Mette; Ghith, Nermin LU ; Heitmann, Berit L. and Tønnesen, Hanne LU (2013) In Tobacco Control 22(6). p.9-9
Abstract
Objectives To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates. Design Observational prospective cohort study. Setting GSPs in pharmacies, hospitals and communities in Denmark, reporting to the national Smoking Cessation Database. Participants Disadvantaged patients, defined as patients with a lower level of education and those receiving unemployment benefits. Interventions 6-week manualised GSP smoking cessation interventions performed by certified staff. Main outcome measures 6months of continuous abstinence, response rate: 80%. Results Continuous... (More)
Objectives To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates. Design Observational prospective cohort study. Setting GSPs in pharmacies, hospitals and communities in Denmark, reporting to the national Smoking Cessation Database. Participants Disadvantaged patients, defined as patients with a lower level of education and those receiving unemployment benefits. Interventions 6-week manualised GSP smoking cessation interventions performed by certified staff. Main outcome measures 6months of continuous abstinence, response rate: 80%. Results Continuous abstinence of the 16?377 responders was 34% (of all 20?588 smokers: 27%). Continuous abstinence was lower in 5738 smokers with a lower educational level (30% of responders and 23% of all) and in 840 unemployed (27% of responders and 19% of all). In respect to modifiable factors, continuous abstinence was found more often after programmes in one-on-one formats (vs group formats) among patients with a lower educational level, 34% (vs 25%, p=0.037), or among unemployed, 35% (vs 24%, p=0.099). The variable format' stayed in the final model of multivariable analyses in patients with a lower educational level, OR=1.31 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.63). Conclusions Although continuous abstinence was lower among disadvantaged smokers, the absolute difference was small. If the programme had been as effective in disadvantaged as in non-disadvantaged groups, there would have been an extra 46 or 8 quitters annually, respectively. Promoting individual interventions among those with a low education may increase the effectiveness of GSP. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Smoking, smoking cessation intervention, health disparities, health, inequalities, nationwide database
in
Tobacco Control
volume
22
issue
6
pages
9 - 9
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000326107800001
  • scopus:84885841427
ISSN
1468-3318
DOI
10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050194
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c3950d06-4ddc-4c7a-b217-46ed6bb8e502 (old id 4212716)
date added to LUP
2014-01-03 10:47:05
date last changed
2019-03-12 02:31:48
@article{c3950d06-4ddc-4c7a-b217-46ed6bb8e502,
  abstract     = {Objectives To evaluate the real-life effect of an evidence-based Gold Standard Programme (GSP) for smoking cessation interventions in disadvantaged patients and to identify modifiable factors that consistently produce the highest abstinence rates. Design Observational prospective cohort study. Setting GSPs in pharmacies, hospitals and communities in Denmark, reporting to the national Smoking Cessation Database. Participants Disadvantaged patients, defined as patients with a lower level of education and those receiving unemployment benefits. Interventions 6-week manualised GSP smoking cessation interventions performed by certified staff. Main outcome measures 6months of continuous abstinence, response rate: 80%. Results Continuous abstinence of the 16?377 responders was 34% (of all 20?588 smokers: 27%). Continuous abstinence was lower in 5738 smokers with a lower educational level (30% of responders and 23% of all) and in 840 unemployed (27% of responders and 19% of all). In respect to modifiable factors, continuous abstinence was found more often after programmes in one-on-one formats (vs group formats) among patients with a lower educational level, 34% (vs 25%, p=0.037), or among unemployed, 35% (vs 24%, p=0.099). The variable format' stayed in the final model of multivariable analyses in patients with a lower educational level, OR=1.31 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.63). Conclusions Although continuous abstinence was lower among disadvantaged smokers, the absolute difference was small. If the programme had been as effective in disadvantaged as in non-disadvantaged groups, there would have been an extra 46 or 8 quitters annually, respectively. Promoting individual interventions among those with a low education may increase the effectiveness of GSP.},
  author       = {Neumann, Tim and Rasmussen, Mette and Ghith, Nermin and Heitmann, Berit L. and Tønnesen, Hanne},
  issn         = {1468-3318},
  keyword      = {Smoking,smoking cessation intervention,health disparities,health,inequalities,nationwide database},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {9--9},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Tobacco Control},
  title        = {The Gold Standard Programme: smoking cessation interventions for disadvantaged smokers are effective in a real-life setting},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050194},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2013},
}