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Brief Report: Knowledge of, Interest in, and Willingness to Try Behavioral Interventions in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease : Knowledge of, Interest in, and Willingness to Try Behavioral Interventions in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease

Benge, Jared F. ; Roberts, R Lynae ; Kekecs, Zoltan LU and Elkins, Gary (2018) In Advances in Mind-Body Medicine 32(1). p.8-12
Abstract

Purpose/Objective • Behavioral interventions hold enormous promise for managing a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite this, prior studies have suggested that the utilization of these interventions is relatively low. The current study seeks to understand factors that could relate to the utilization of PD behavioral strategies. Specifically, the study evaluates the self-described knowledge of, interest in, and willingness to participate in behavioral interventions in a community-dwelling sample of individuals with PD. Research Method/Design • Forty-five individuals with PD completed a survey that assessed knowledge, interest, and willingness to participate in 5 behavioral interventions: hypnosis,... (More)

Purpose/Objective • Behavioral interventions hold enormous promise for managing a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite this, prior studies have suggested that the utilization of these interventions is relatively low. The current study seeks to understand factors that could relate to the utilization of PD behavioral strategies. Specifically, the study evaluates the self-described knowledge of, interest in, and willingness to participate in behavioral interventions in a community-dwelling sample of individuals with PD. Research Method/Design • Forty-five individuals with PD completed a survey that assessed knowledge, interest, and willingness to participate in 5 behavioral interventions: hypnosis, relaxation training, mindfulness/meditation, computerized "brain games," and counseling. In addition, participants self-reported their quality of life across several domains; these domain scores were correlated with overall ratings of interest and willingness to participate in behavioral interventions. Results • Self-reported knowledge of behavioral interventions was low, but interest and willingness to participate was moderate to high across modalities. Statistically significant correlations were noted between perceived knowledge of the techniques and interest (r = 0.29, P = .05) as well as willingness to participate (r = 0.32, P = .03) in these techniques. Interest and willingness were also correlated with self-reported bodily discomfort (r = 0.36, P = .02). Conclusions/Implications • The participants of the current sample were interested and willing to participate in behavioral interventions but had limited knowledge of the potential for these techniques to manage their symptoms. The reported high level of willingness to participate in behavioral interventions suggests that it is feasible to provide behavioral interventions in this population.

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published
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in
Advances in Mind-Body Medicine
volume
32
issue
1
pages
5 pages
external identifiers
  • scopus:85051303062
  • scopus:85051303062
  • pmid:29406302
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c685561f-ceb7-410c-a2eb-4987ff4bdd80
date added to LUP
2018-06-08 10:51:00
date last changed
2019-12-04 07:13:03
@article{c685561f-ceb7-410c-a2eb-4987ff4bdd80,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose/Objective • Behavioral interventions hold enormous promise for managing a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite this, prior studies have suggested that the utilization of these interventions is relatively low. The current study seeks to understand factors that could relate to the utilization of PD behavioral strategies. Specifically, the study evaluates the self-described knowledge of, interest in, and willingness to participate in behavioral interventions in a community-dwelling sample of individuals with PD. Research Method/Design • Forty-five individuals with PD completed a survey that assessed knowledge, interest, and willingness to participate in 5 behavioral interventions: hypnosis, relaxation training, mindfulness/meditation, computerized "brain games," and counseling. In addition, participants self-reported their quality of life across several domains; these domain scores were correlated with overall ratings of interest and willingness to participate in behavioral interventions. Results • Self-reported knowledge of behavioral interventions was low, but interest and willingness to participate was moderate to high across modalities. Statistically significant correlations were noted between perceived knowledge of the techniques and interest (r = 0.29, P = .05) as well as willingness to participate (r = 0.32, P = .03) in these techniques. Interest and willingness were also correlated with self-reported bodily discomfort (r = 0.36, P = .02). Conclusions/Implications • The participants of the current sample were interested and willing to participate in behavioral interventions but had limited knowledge of the potential for these techniques to manage their symptoms. The reported high level of willingness to participate in behavioral interventions suggests that it is feasible to provide behavioral interventions in this population.</p>},
  author       = {Benge, Jared F. and Roberts, R Lynae and Kekecs, Zoltan and Elkins, Gary},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {8--12},
  series       = {Advances in Mind-Body Medicine},
  title        = {Brief Report: Knowledge of, Interest in, and Willingness to Try Behavioral Interventions in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease : Knowledge of, Interest in, and Willingness to Try Behavioral Interventions in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2018},
}