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Occupational and socio-economic risk factors for giant cell arteritis: a nationwide study based on hospitalizations in Sweden.

Zöller, Bengt LU ; Li, Xinjun LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU and Sundquist, Kristina LU (2013) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 42(6). p.487-497
Abstract
Objectives: Socio-economic and occupational factors may contribute to risk of immune-mediated disorders. The importance of these factors in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is unknown. This is the first nationwide study with the aim of investigating possible associations between socio-economic status (SES)/occupation and hospitalization for GCA. Method: A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a main diagnosis of GCA in Swedish adults between 1970 and 2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for different occupations. Three cohorts were defined based on 53 occupational titles recorded in... (More)
Objectives: Socio-economic and occupational factors may contribute to risk of immune-mediated disorders. The importance of these factors in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is unknown. This is the first nationwide study with the aim of investigating possible associations between socio-economic status (SES)/occupation and hospitalization for GCA. Method: A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a main diagnosis of GCA in Swedish adults between 1970 and 2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for different occupations. Three cohorts were defined based on 53 occupational titles recorded in Swedish census data in 1970, 1980, and 1990. Results: In individuals aged over 50 years, 3293 males and 4726 females were hospitalized with GCA. Only minor or inconsistent associations were observed for education and SES and GCA. Some occupations were associated with increased risk of GCA. However, the risks were modest or not consistent between the three cohorts investigated. Only male fishermen, whalers, and sealers had an SIR of > 2 (2.14). However, the risk of GCA was only increased in one cohort. Both women (0.83) and men (0.83) born outside Sweden had a lower risk of GCA. The adjustment variables hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and coronary heart disease (CHD) were associated with higher risk of GCA. Conclusions: Occupation and SES are not strong risk factors for GCA. However, GCA was associated with co-morbidities and country of birth, calling for further studies. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
42
issue
6
pages
487 - 497
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000327259200011
  • pmid:23815287
  • scopus:84887927355
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.3109/03009742.2013.793777
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c8b7f066-7e79-476f-8b1d-3d93fc77bfa3 (old id 3956302)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23815287?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-08-01 14:37:30
date last changed
2019-02-20 02:33:31
@article{c8b7f066-7e79-476f-8b1d-3d93fc77bfa3,
  abstract     = {Objectives: Socio-economic and occupational factors may contribute to risk of immune-mediated disorders. The importance of these factors in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is unknown. This is the first nationwide study with the aim of investigating possible associations between socio-economic status (SES)/occupation and hospitalization for GCA. Method: A nationwide database was constructed by linking Swedish census data to the Hospital Discharge Register to obtain data on all first hospitalizations with a main diagnosis of GCA in Swedish adults between 1970 and 2008. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for different occupations. Three cohorts were defined based on 53 occupational titles recorded in Swedish census data in 1970, 1980, and 1990. Results: In individuals aged over 50 years, 3293 males and 4726 females were hospitalized with GCA. Only minor or inconsistent associations were observed for education and SES and GCA. Some occupations were associated with increased risk of GCA. However, the risks were modest or not consistent between the three cohorts investigated. Only male fishermen, whalers, and sealers had an SIR of > 2 (2.14). However, the risk of GCA was only increased in one cohort. Both women (0.83) and men (0.83) born outside Sweden had a lower risk of GCA. The adjustment variables hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and coronary heart disease (CHD) were associated with higher risk of GCA. Conclusions: Occupation and SES are not strong risk factors for GCA. However, GCA was associated with co-morbidities and country of birth, calling for further studies.},
  author       = {Zöller, Bengt and Li, Xinjun and Sundquist, Jan and Sundquist, Kristina},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {487--497},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Occupational and socio-economic risk factors for giant cell arteritis: a nationwide study based on hospitalizations in Sweden.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009742.2013.793777},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2013},
}