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Interfacial properties of POPC/GDO liquid crystalline nanoparticles deposited on anionic and cationic silica surfaces

Chang, Debby P. LU ; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P. LU ; Campbell, Richard A. LU ; Wadsäter, Maria LU ; Barauskas, Justas LU ; Tiberg, Fredrik LU and Nylander, Tommy LU (2016) In Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 18(38). p.26630-26642
Abstract

Reversed lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) of the cubic micellar (I2) phase have high potential in drug delivery applications due to their ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drug molecules. Their interactions with various interfaces, and the consequences for the particle structure and integrity, are essential considerations in their effectiveness as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we have studied LCNPs formed of equal fractions of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and glycerol dioleate in the presence of different fractions of the stabilizer Polysorbate 80. We have used a combination of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and neutron... (More)

Reversed lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) of the cubic micellar (I2) phase have high potential in drug delivery applications due to their ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drug molecules. Their interactions with various interfaces, and the consequences for the particle structure and integrity, are essential considerations in their effectiveness as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we have studied LCNPs formed of equal fractions of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and glycerol dioleate in the presence of different fractions of the stabilizer Polysorbate 80. We have used a combination of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and neutron reflectometry to reveal the structure and composition of the adsorbed layer on both anionic silica and cationic (aminopropyltriethoxysilane) silanized surfaces. For both types of surfaces, there is a spread near-surface layer comprising lipid and polymer as well as a sparse coverage of intact particles. The composition of the near-surface layer is very close to that of the particles, in contrast to the lipid bilayer observed with related systems. The interaction is stronger for cationic than anionic surfaces, which is rationalized in terms of the negative zeta potential of the LCNPs. The work shows that the attachment of and spreading from LCNPs is influenced by the properties of the surface, the internal structure, composition and stability of the particles as well as the nature of the stabilizer.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
volume
18
issue
38
pages
13 pages
publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
external identifiers
  • scopus:84989859811
  • wos:000385175000032
ISSN
1463-9076
DOI
10.1039/c6cp04506e
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c95d4b3e-610a-4025-9c68-2ca0d46badd0
date added to LUP
2017-02-16 09:24:28
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:32:46
@article{c95d4b3e-610a-4025-9c68-2ca0d46badd0,
  abstract     = {<p>Reversed lipid liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) of the cubic micellar (I<sub>2</sub>) phase have high potential in drug delivery applications due to their ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drug molecules. Their interactions with various interfaces, and the consequences for the particle structure and integrity, are essential considerations in their effectiveness as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we have studied LCNPs formed of equal fractions of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and glycerol dioleate in the presence of different fractions of the stabilizer Polysorbate 80. We have used a combination of ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and neutron reflectometry to reveal the structure and composition of the adsorbed layer on both anionic silica and cationic (aminopropyltriethoxysilane) silanized surfaces. For both types of surfaces, there is a spread near-surface layer comprising lipid and polymer as well as a sparse coverage of intact particles. The composition of the near-surface layer is very close to that of the particles, in contrast to the lipid bilayer observed with related systems. The interaction is stronger for cationic than anionic surfaces, which is rationalized in terms of the negative zeta potential of the LCNPs. The work shows that the attachment of and spreading from LCNPs is influenced by the properties of the surface, the internal structure, composition and stability of the particles as well as the nature of the stabilizer.</p>},
  author       = {Chang, Debby P. and Dabkowska, Aleksandra P. and Campbell, Richard A. and Wadsäter, Maria and Barauskas, Justas and Tiberg, Fredrik and Nylander, Tommy},
  issn         = {1463-9076},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {38},
  pages        = {26630--26642},
  publisher    = {Royal Society of Chemistry},
  series       = {Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics},
  title        = {Interfacial properties of POPC/GDO liquid crystalline nanoparticles deposited on anionic and cationic silica surfaces},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cp04506e},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2016},
}