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Empowerment, self and engagement in day center occupations : a longitudinal study among people with long-term mental illness

Sutton, Daniel; Bejerholm, Ulrika LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2017) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
Abstract

Background: Day centers are a common form of mental health service internationally. They are aimed at enhancing occupational engagement and social relations, but there is a need to clarify the outcomes of day center programs, including the impact on important aspects of recovery such as empowerment. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore whether perceived empowerment changed over time among Swedish day center users and whether self-esteem, quality of life, socio-demographic data and self-reported diagnosis, type of program and level of engagement in day center occupations could predict future empowerment. Method: The study involved a re-analysis of longitudinal data from 14 day centers, where measures of perceived empowerment and... (More)

Background: Day centers are a common form of mental health service internationally. They are aimed at enhancing occupational engagement and social relations, but there is a need to clarify the outcomes of day center programs, including the impact on important aspects of recovery such as empowerment. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore whether perceived empowerment changed over time among Swedish day center users and whether self-esteem, quality of life, socio-demographic data and self-reported diagnosis, type of program and level of engagement in day center occupations could predict future empowerment. Method: The study involved a re-analysis of longitudinal data from 14 day centers, where measures of perceived empowerment and other individual factors were collected over a 15-month period. Non-parametric statistics were used, including Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test and logistic regression analysis. Results: There were no significant changes in day center attendee empowerment scores. Self-esteem and level of engagement in day center occupations were found to be predictors of empowerment, together explaining 34% of the variation. Conclusions: Developing empowerment in the day center context involves a complex interaction of individual, social and material factors. Potential barriers to empowerment are discussed along with considerations related to measuring empowerment as an outcome of day center programs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Day services, recovery, self-esteem
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
pages
10 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85033500146
ISSN
1103-8128
DOI
10.1080/11038128.2017.1397742
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c97e0559-1d51-4597-b716-edc0715cf1ed
date added to LUP
2017-11-22 10:56:15
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:26:25
@article{c97e0559-1d51-4597-b716-edc0715cf1ed,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Day centers are a common form of mental health service internationally. They are aimed at enhancing occupational engagement and social relations, but there is a need to clarify the outcomes of day center programs, including the impact on important aspects of recovery such as empowerment. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore whether perceived empowerment changed over time among Swedish day center users and whether self-esteem, quality of life, socio-demographic data and self-reported diagnosis, type of program and level of engagement in day center occupations could predict future empowerment. Method: The study involved a re-analysis of longitudinal data from 14 day centers, where measures of perceived empowerment and other individual factors were collected over a 15-month period. Non-parametric statistics were used, including Wilcoxon’s signed-rank test and logistic regression analysis. Results: There were no significant changes in day center attendee empowerment scores. Self-esteem and level of engagement in day center occupations were found to be predictors of empowerment, together explaining 34% of the variation. Conclusions: Developing empowerment in the day center context involves a complex interaction of individual, social and material factors. Potential barriers to empowerment are discussed along with considerations related to measuring empowerment as an outcome of day center programs.</p>},
  author       = {Sutton, Daniel and Bejerholm, Ulrika and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1103-8128},
  keyword      = {Day services,recovery,self-esteem},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {10},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Empowerment, self and engagement in day center occupations : a longitudinal study among people with long-term mental illness},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038128.2017.1397742},
  year         = {2017},
}