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The challenge of living with diabetes in women and younger adults : A structural equation model

Aghili, Rokhsareh; Ridderstråle, Martin LU ; Kia, Maryam; Ebrahim Valojerdi, Ameneh; Malek, Mojtaba; Farshchi, Amir and Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim (2017) In Primary Care Diabetes
Abstract

Background: Attitudes toward diabetes care are different between genders and age-groups. Furthermore, diabetes related challenges may cause psychosocial problems. Therefore, we were to compare the psychosocial status and glycemic control in women and men with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in different age-groups. Methods: 441 adults with T2D were recruited. Demographic, self-care behavior, resources and affective variables as well as the health related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured. The median age of 55 was used as the cut-off for the age comparison. Structured equation modeling (SEM) investigated the relationship between age, gender, psychosocial factors and glycemic control. Results: Finally, 203 women and 177 men completed the study... (More)

Background: Attitudes toward diabetes care are different between genders and age-groups. Furthermore, diabetes related challenges may cause psychosocial problems. Therefore, we were to compare the psychosocial status and glycemic control in women and men with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in different age-groups. Methods: 441 adults with T2D were recruited. Demographic, self-care behavior, resources and affective variables as well as the health related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured. The median age of 55 was used as the cut-off for the age comparison. Structured equation modeling (SEM) investigated the relationship between age, gender, psychosocial factors and glycemic control. Results: Finally, 203 women and 177 men completed the study (86.1%). There was no significant difference in mean duration of T2D, or glycemic control between genders or age-groups. Women, especially those below the median age of 55, had significantly higher level of diabetes-related distress (2.16. ±. 0.94 vs. 1.92. ±. 0.81), depression (9.67. ±. 5.37 vs. 7.54. ±. 5.06), and anxiety (19.81. ±. 12.04 vs. 12.81. ±. 9.04, P. <. 0.05 for all comparisons), while people above the age of 55 reported better self-management and patient-physician relationship. HRQoL was lower in women compared to men (0.77. ±. 0.23 vs. 0.81. ±. 0.18, P = 0.02). The final SEM suggested that the effect (standardized β coefficient) of gender and age on affective variables was 0.25 and -0.19 (P. <. 0.05), respectively, though psychosocial factors did not directly influence HbA1c. Conclusions: This study shows that psychosocial factors are associated with age and gender in patients with T2D; with younger women demonstrating higher level of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and diabetes-related distress independent of status of glycemic control.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Age, Diabetes, Gender, Psychosocial factors, Type 2
in
Primary Care Diabetes
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020030570
ISSN
1751-9918
DOI
10.1016/j.pcd.2017.05.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cc4b61c1-d3de-45f0-9839-3035ffcd2fe1
date added to LUP
2017-06-16 12:07:36
date last changed
2017-06-18 03:00:11
@article{cc4b61c1-d3de-45f0-9839-3035ffcd2fe1,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Attitudes toward diabetes care are different between genders and age-groups. Furthermore, diabetes related challenges may cause psychosocial problems. Therefore, we were to compare the psychosocial status and glycemic control in women and men with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in different age-groups. Methods: 441 adults with T2D were recruited. Demographic, self-care behavior, resources and affective variables as well as the health related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured. The median age of 55 was used as the cut-off for the age comparison. Structured equation modeling (SEM) investigated the relationship between age, gender, psychosocial factors and glycemic control. Results: Finally, 203 women and 177 men completed the study (86.1%). There was no significant difference in mean duration of T2D, or glycemic control between genders or age-groups. Women, especially those below the median age of 55, had significantly higher level of diabetes-related distress (2.16. ±. 0.94 vs. 1.92. ±. 0.81), depression (9.67. ±. 5.37 vs. 7.54. ±. 5.06), and anxiety (19.81. ±. 12.04 vs. 12.81. ±. 9.04, P. &lt;. 0.05 for all comparisons), while people above the age of 55 reported better self-management and patient-physician relationship. HRQoL was lower in women compared to men (0.77. ±. 0.23 vs. 0.81. ±. 0.18, P = 0.02). The final SEM suggested that the effect (standardized β coefficient) of gender and age on affective variables was 0.25 and -0.19 (P. &lt;. 0.05), respectively, though psychosocial factors did not directly influence HbA1c. Conclusions: This study shows that psychosocial factors are associated with age and gender in patients with T2D; with younger women demonstrating higher level of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and diabetes-related distress independent of status of glycemic control.</p>},
  author       = {Aghili, Rokhsareh and Ridderstråle, Martin and Kia, Maryam and Ebrahim Valojerdi, Ameneh and Malek, Mojtaba and Farshchi, Amir and Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim},
  issn         = {1751-9918},
  keyword      = {Age,Diabetes,Gender,Psychosocial factors,Type 2},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Primary Care Diabetes},
  title        = {The challenge of living with diabetes in women and younger adults : A structural equation model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2017.05.001},
  year         = {2017},
}