Advanced

Do we trust the poor? Probing a game paradigm for measuring discriminatory behavior

Lindqvist, Anna LU and Björklund, Fredrik LU (2017) In Lund Psychological Reports 16(1).
Abstract (Swedish)
The aim of the present research was to evaluate a computerized version of the Trust game as a
method for studying real-life decisions and discriminatory behavior towards the poor. The stereotype of the poor typically consists of low perceived competence and medium/high perceived warmth. According to the BIAS map (Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes), this should trigger behavioral tendencies of passive harm towards the poor, as compared to the ‘average man’ which served as our control condition, and could be expected to receive facilitatory behavior. The participants (n = 210) played a trust game online with someone portrayed to have either low or medium-high socio-economic status – while they in fact played with the... (More)
The aim of the present research was to evaluate a computerized version of the Trust game as a
method for studying real-life decisions and discriminatory behavior towards the poor. The stereotype of the poor typically consists of low perceived competence and medium/high perceived warmth. According to the BIAS map (Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes), this should trigger behavioral tendencies of passive harm towards the poor, as compared to the ‘average man’ which served as our control condition, and could be expected to receive facilitatory behavior. The participants (n = 210) played a trust game online with someone portrayed to have either low or medium-high socio-economic status – while they in fact played with the computer. Their task was to decide to what extent they could trust the other player: if both collaborated they would receive the maximum reward. The results indicate that very few participants suspected that they were not playing with an actual person. Some of their responses in the trust game can be interpreted as being in line with the BIAS map, i.e. tendencies of passive harm towards the player with low SES and passive facilitation towards the player with medium-high SES. This suggests that a computerized trust game with a simulated other player may be a viable method for investigating real-life collaboative behavior. Remaining psychometric challenges are discussed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
in
Lund Psychological Reports
volume
16
issue
1
publisher
Lund University
ISSN
1404-8035
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ccea7fa2-c8a9-4949-8d4f-55be6944fb1d
alternative location
http://www.psy.lu.se/sites/psy.lu.se/files/lpr_1601.pdf
date added to LUP
2017-10-18 15:21:25
date last changed
2017-10-18 15:58:59
@techreport{ccea7fa2-c8a9-4949-8d4f-55be6944fb1d,
  abstract     = {The aim of the present research was to evaluate a computerized version of the Trust game as a<br/>method for studying real-life decisions and discriminatory behavior towards the poor. The stereotype of the poor typically consists of low perceived competence and medium/high perceived warmth. According to the BIAS map (Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes), this should trigger behavioral tendencies of passive harm towards the poor, as compared to the ‘average man’ which served as our control condition, and could be expected to receive facilitatory behavior. The participants (n = 210) played a trust game online with someone portrayed to have either low or medium-high socio-economic status – while they in fact played with the computer. Their task was to decide to what extent they could trust the other player: if both collaborated they would receive the maximum reward. The results indicate that very few participants suspected that they were not playing with an actual person. Some of their responses in the trust game can be interpreted as being in line with the BIAS map, i.e. tendencies of passive harm towards the player with low SES and passive facilitation towards the player with medium-high SES. This suggests that a computerized trust game with a simulated other player may be a viable method for investigating real-life collaboative behavior. Remaining psychometric challenges are discussed.},
  author       = {Lindqvist, Anna and Björklund, Fredrik},
  institution  = {Lund University},
  issn         = {1404-8035},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  series       = {Lund Psychological Reports},
  title        = {Do we trust the poor? Probing a game paradigm for measuring discriminatory behavior},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2017},
}