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Variations in the vitamin D receptor gene are not associated with measures of muscle strength, physical performance, or falls in elderly men. Data from MrOS Sweden

Björk, A. LU ; Ribom, E.; Johansson, G.; Scragg, R.; Mellström, D.; Grundberg, E.; Ohlsson, C.; Karlsson, M. LU ; Ljunggren, and Kindmark, A. (2018) In Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Abstract

The vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several musculoskeletal phenotypes. However, previous results on the associations between genetic variants of the VDR with muscle strength and falls have been contradictory. The MrOS Sweden survey, a prospective population-based cohort study of 3014 elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69–81) offered the opportunity to further investigate these associations. At baseline, data were collected on muscle strength and also the prevalence of falls during the previous 12 months. Genetic association analysis was performed for 7 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), covering the genetic region surrounding the VDR gene in 2924 men with available samples of DNA. Genetic... (More)

The vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several musculoskeletal phenotypes. However, previous results on the associations between genetic variants of the VDR with muscle strength and falls have been contradictory. The MrOS Sweden survey, a prospective population-based cohort study of 3014 elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69–81) offered the opportunity to further investigate these associations. At baseline, data were collected on muscle strength and also the prevalence of falls during the previous 12 months. Genetic association analysis was performed for 7 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), covering the genetic region surrounding the VDR gene in 2924 men with available samples of DNA. Genetic variations in the VDR were not associated with five different measurements of muscle strength or physical performance (hand grip strength right and left, 6 m walking test (easy and narrow) and timed-stands test). However, one of the 7 SNPs of the gene for the VDR receptor, rs7136534, was associated with prevalence of falls (33.6% of the AA, 14.6% of the AG and 16.5% of the GG allele). In conclusion, VDR genetic variants are not related to muscle strength or physical performance in elderly Swedish men. The role of the rs7136534 SNP for the occurrence of falls is not clear.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Falls, Muscle strength, Physical performance, Polymorphisms, Vitamin D receptor gene
in
Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85057404013
ISSN
0960-0760
DOI
10.1016/j.jsbmb.2018.11.014
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cf898fd7-1f14-42d8-bef6-b4027ccef31d
date added to LUP
2018-12-10 12:32:05
date last changed
2019-01-14 07:40:04
@article{cf898fd7-1f14-42d8-bef6-b4027ccef31d,
  abstract     = {<p>The vitamin D receptor (VDR) has been proposed as a candidate gene for several musculoskeletal phenotypes. However, previous results on the associations between genetic variants of the VDR with muscle strength and falls have been contradictory. The MrOS Sweden survey, a prospective population-based cohort study of 3014 elderly men (mean age 75 years, range 69–81) offered the opportunity to further investigate these associations. At baseline, data were collected on muscle strength and also the prevalence of falls during the previous 12 months. Genetic association analysis was performed for 7 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), covering the genetic region surrounding the VDR gene in 2924 men with available samples of DNA. Genetic variations in the VDR were not associated with five different measurements of muscle strength or physical performance (hand grip strength right and left, 6 m walking test (easy and narrow) and timed-stands test). However, one of the 7 SNPs of the gene for the VDR receptor, rs7136534, was associated with prevalence of falls (33.6% of the AA, 14.6% of the AG and 16.5% of the GG allele). In conclusion, VDR genetic variants are not related to muscle strength or physical performance in elderly Swedish men. The role of the rs7136534 SNP for the occurrence of falls is not clear.</p>},
  author       = {Björk, A. and Ribom, E. and Johansson, G. and Scragg, R. and Mellström, D. and Grundberg, E. and Ohlsson, C. and Karlsson, M. and Ljunggren,  and Kindmark, A.},
  issn         = {0960-0760},
  keyword      = {Falls,Muscle strength,Physical performance,Polymorphisms,Vitamin D receptor gene},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology},
  title        = {Variations in the vitamin D receptor gene are not associated with measures of muscle strength, physical performance, or falls in elderly men. Data from MrOS Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2018.11.014},
  year         = {2018},
}