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Immunophenotypic identification of early myeloerythroid development

Pronk, Cornelis J.H. LU and Bryder, David LU (2018) In Flow Cytometry Protocols 1678. p.301-319
Abstract

Myeloerythroid-restricted precursor cells, derived from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, give rise to mature cells of the granulocyte, monocyte, erythroid, and/or thrombocytic lineages. High-resolution profiling of the developmental stages, from hematopoietic stem cells to mature progeny, is important to be able to study and understand the underlying mechanisms that guide various cell fate decisions. Also, this approach opens for greater insights into pathogenic events such as leukemia, diseases that are most often characterized by halted differentiation at defined immature precursor levels. In this chapter, we provide protocols and discuss approaches concerning the analysis and purification of immature myeloerythroid lineages by... (More)

Myeloerythroid-restricted precursor cells, derived from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, give rise to mature cells of the granulocyte, monocyte, erythroid, and/or thrombocytic lineages. High-resolution profiling of the developmental stages, from hematopoietic stem cells to mature progeny, is important to be able to study and understand the underlying mechanisms that guide various cell fate decisions. Also, this approach opens for greater insights into pathogenic events such as leukemia, diseases that are most often characterized by halted differentiation at defined immature precursor levels. In this chapter, we provide protocols and discuss approaches concerning the analysis and purification of immature myeloerythroid lineages by multiparameter flow cytometry. A wealth of literature has demonstrated the feasibility of similar approaches also for the human system. However, in this chapter, we focus on the identification of bone marrow cells derived from C57BL/6 mice, in which flow cytometry-based immunophenotypic applications have been most widely developed. This should allow also for its application in genetically modified models on this background. For maximal reproducibility, all protocols described have been established using reagents from commercial vendors to be analyzed on a flow cytometer with factory standard configuration.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cell isolation, Differentiation, Erythropoiesis myeloerythropoesis, Flow cytometry, Hematopoiesis, Immunophenotype, Myelopoiesis
in
Flow Cytometry Protocols
volume
1678
pages
19 pages
publisher
Humana Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85032586258
ISSN
10643745
ISBN
978-1-4939-7346-0
DOI
10.1007/978-1-4939-7346-0_13
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d33b10d7-340f-416f-b7f6-e950235ab2b0
date added to LUP
2017-11-07 10:50:54
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:24:58
@inbook{d33b10d7-340f-416f-b7f6-e950235ab2b0,
  abstract     = {<p>Myeloerythroid-restricted precursor cells, derived from multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, give rise to mature cells of the granulocyte, monocyte, erythroid, and/or thrombocytic lineages. High-resolution profiling of the developmental stages, from hematopoietic stem cells to mature progeny, is important to be able to study and understand the underlying mechanisms that guide various cell fate decisions. Also, this approach opens for greater insights into pathogenic events such as leukemia, diseases that are most often characterized by halted differentiation at defined immature precursor levels. In this chapter, we provide protocols and discuss approaches concerning the analysis and purification of immature myeloerythroid lineages by multiparameter flow cytometry. A wealth of literature has demonstrated the feasibility of similar approaches also for the human system. However, in this chapter, we focus on the identification of bone marrow cells derived from C57BL/6 mice, in which flow cytometry-based immunophenotypic applications have been most widely developed. This should allow also for its application in genetically modified models on this background. For maximal reproducibility, all protocols described have been established using reagents from commercial vendors to be analyzed on a flow cytometer with factory standard configuration.</p>},
  author       = {Pronk, Cornelis J.H. and Bryder, David},
  isbn         = {978-1-4939-7346-0},
  issn         = {10643745},
  keyword      = {Cell isolation,Differentiation,Erythropoiesis myeloerythropoesis,Flow cytometry,Hematopoiesis,Immunophenotype,Myelopoiesis},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {301--319},
  publisher    = {Humana Press},
  series       = {Flow Cytometry Protocols},
  title        = {Immunophenotypic identification of early myeloerythroid development},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7346-0_13},
  volume       = {1678},
  year         = {2018},
}