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Animal Signals : Dirty Dancing in the Dark?

Warrant, Eric J. LU (2019) In Current Biology 29(17). p.834-836
Abstract

The use of highly visible body colours as signals during courtship is well known from animals active in brighter light. Now a sexually dimorphic colouration signal has been discovered in a nocturnal moth, suggesting that visual courtship rituals might even occur at night.

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Current Biology
volume
29
issue
17
pages
834 - 836
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85071661833
ISSN
0960-9822
DOI
10.1016/j.cub.2019.07.046
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d5c68580-175b-4203-88fd-0e4d667afe4c
date added to LUP
2019-09-16 14:20:55
date last changed
2019-10-08 03:57:48
@article{d5c68580-175b-4203-88fd-0e4d667afe4c,
  abstract     = {<p>The use of highly visible body colours as signals during courtship is well known from animals active in brighter light. Now a sexually dimorphic colouration signal has been discovered in a nocturnal moth, suggesting that visual courtship rituals might even occur at night.</p>},
  author       = {Warrant, Eric J.},
  issn         = {0960-9822},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {17},
  pages        = {834--836},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Current Biology},
  title        = {Animal Signals : Dirty Dancing in the Dark?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.07.046},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2019},
}