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Group leader and participant perceptions of Balancing Everyday Life, a group-based lifestyle intervention for mental health service users

Lund, Kristine LU ; Hultqvist, Jenny LU ; Bejerholm, Ulrika LU ; Argentzell, Elisabeth LU and Eklund, Mona LU (2019) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
Abstract

Background: There exist few recovery and occupation-based interventions for mental health service users. Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) is a new occupation-based lifestyle intervention that was created to fill this need. Aim: To gain group leaders’ and participants’ perspectives of the BEL intervention content and format, including factors that helped, hindered, and could be improved. Methods: A constructivist grounded theory method guided data collection and analysis. Interviews took place with 12 BEL group leaders and 19 BEL participants from out-patient psychiatry settings and community-based day centers in Sweden. Results: BEL’s structure and content were appreciated, yet flexibility was desired to adapt to participant needs. BEL... (More)

Background: There exist few recovery and occupation-based interventions for mental health service users. Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) is a new occupation-based lifestyle intervention that was created to fill this need. Aim: To gain group leaders’ and participants’ perspectives of the BEL intervention content and format, including factors that helped, hindered, and could be improved. Methods: A constructivist grounded theory method guided data collection and analysis. Interviews took place with 12 BEL group leaders and 19 BEL participants from out-patient psychiatry settings and community-based day centers in Sweden. Results: BEL’s structure and content were appreciated, yet flexibility was desired to adapt to participant needs. BEL could act as a bridge, helping participants connect with others, and to a more engaged and balanced everyday life. Facilitating factors included a person-focused (versus illness-focused) approach, physical and emotional environments, and connection. Barriers included room resources. More sessions were desired for the intervention. Conclusion: Group leaders and participants experienced BEL as a useful tool to instigate meaningful change and connection in the participants’ lives. The combination of a positive person-focused approach and group support was appreciated. These results could inform future research, evaluation, and development of occupation-focused lifestyle interventions for mental health service users.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
grounded theory, group intervention, groups, lifestyle, mental health, Mental illness, occupational therapy
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85060870536
ISSN
1103-8128
DOI
10.1080/11038128.2018.1551419
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d63987dc-a71e-415b-9a01-506a26f467ab
date added to LUP
2019-02-15 10:35:52
date last changed
2019-03-05 04:33:56
@article{d63987dc-a71e-415b-9a01-506a26f467ab,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: There exist few recovery and occupation-based interventions for mental health service users. Balancing Everyday Life (BEL) is a new occupation-based lifestyle intervention that was created to fill this need. Aim: To gain group leaders’ and participants’ perspectives of the BEL intervention content and format, including factors that helped, hindered, and could be improved. Methods: A constructivist grounded theory method guided data collection and analysis. Interviews took place with 12 BEL group leaders and 19 BEL participants from out-patient psychiatry settings and community-based day centers in Sweden. Results: BEL’s structure and content were appreciated, yet flexibility was desired to adapt to participant needs. BEL could act as a bridge, helping participants connect with others, and to a more engaged and balanced everyday life. Facilitating factors included a person-focused (versus illness-focused) approach, physical and emotional environments, and connection. Barriers included room resources. More sessions were desired for the intervention. Conclusion: Group leaders and participants experienced BEL as a useful tool to instigate meaningful change and connection in the participants’ lives. The combination of a positive person-focused approach and group support was appreciated. These results could inform future research, evaluation, and development of occupation-focused lifestyle interventions for mental health service users.</p>},
  author       = {Lund, Kristine and Hultqvist, Jenny and Bejerholm, Ulrika and Argentzell, Elisabeth and Eklund, Mona},
  issn         = {1103-8128},
  keyword      = {grounded theory,group intervention,groups,lifestyle,mental health,Mental illness,occupational therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Group leader and participant perceptions of Balancing Everyday Life, a group-based lifestyle intervention for mental health service users},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11038128.2018.1551419},
  year         = {2019},
}