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Streptococcus pyogenes biofilm growth in vitro and in vivo and its role in colonization, virulence, and genetic exchange

Marks, Laura R; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Federle, Michael J and Hakansson, Anders P LU (2014) In Journal of Infectious Diseases 210(1). p.25-34
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) commonly colonizes the oropharynx and nonintact skin. However, colonization has been little studied and the role of biofilm formation is unclear, as biofilm experiments to date have not been conducted under conditions that mimic the host environment.

METHODS: In this study we grew GAS biofilms on human keratinocytes under various environmental conditions and used this model to evaluate colonization, invasive disease and natural transformation.

RESULTS: GAS grown on epithelial cells, but not biofilms grown on abiotic surfaces, produced biofilms with characteristics similar to in vivo colonization. These biofilm bacteria showed a 100-fold higher bacterial burden of nasal-associated... (More)

BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) commonly colonizes the oropharynx and nonintact skin. However, colonization has been little studied and the role of biofilm formation is unclear, as biofilm experiments to date have not been conducted under conditions that mimic the host environment.

METHODS: In this study we grew GAS biofilms on human keratinocytes under various environmental conditions and used this model to evaluate colonization, invasive disease and natural transformation.

RESULTS: GAS grown on epithelial cells, but not biofilms grown on abiotic surfaces, produced biofilms with characteristics similar to in vivo colonization. These biofilm bacteria showed a 100-fold higher bacterial burden of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue in mice than broth-grown bacteria, and were not virulent during septic infection, which was attributed in part to down-regulation of genes typically involved in localized and invasive disease. We also showed for the first time that GAS were naturally transformable when grown in biofilms and during colonization of NALT in vivo.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide novel model systems to study biofilm formation of GAS in vitro and in vivo, suggest an important role for biofilm formation during GAS colonization, and provide an explanation for the known genome diversity within the GAS population.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Animals, Biofilms, Cells, Cultured, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Humans, Keratinocytes, Lymphoid Tissue, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Nasal Cavity, Streptococcus pyogenes
in
Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
210
issue
1
pages
10 pages
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84903204020
ISSN
1537-6613
DOI
10.1093/infdis/jiu058
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d6636feb-f6a4-444a-a6c0-1deccf4072ac
date added to LUP
2016-05-21 10:46:54
date last changed
2017-05-29 15:43:53
@article{d6636feb-f6a4-444a-a6c0-1deccf4072ac,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Group A streptococcus (GAS) commonly colonizes the oropharynx and nonintact skin. However, colonization has been little studied and the role of biofilm formation is unclear, as biofilm experiments to date have not been conducted under conditions that mimic the host environment.</p><p>METHODS: In this study we grew GAS biofilms on human keratinocytes under various environmental conditions and used this model to evaluate colonization, invasive disease and natural transformation.</p><p>RESULTS: GAS grown on epithelial cells, but not biofilms grown on abiotic surfaces, produced biofilms with characteristics similar to in vivo colonization. These biofilm bacteria showed a 100-fold higher bacterial burden of nasal-associated lymphoid tissue in mice than broth-grown bacteria, and were not virulent during septic infection, which was attributed in part to down-regulation of genes typically involved in localized and invasive disease. We also showed for the first time that GAS were naturally transformable when grown in biofilms and during colonization of NALT in vivo.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide novel model systems to study biofilm formation of GAS in vitro and in vivo, suggest an important role for biofilm formation during GAS colonization, and provide an explanation for the known genome diversity within the GAS population.</p>},
  author       = {Marks, Laura R and Mashburn-Warren, Lauren and Federle, Michael J and Hakansson, Anders P},
  issn         = {1537-6613},
  keyword      = {Animals,Biofilms,Cells, Cultured,Gene Transfer, Horizontal,Humans,Keratinocytes,Lymphoid Tissue,Mice,Mice, Inbred BALB C,Nasal Cavity,Streptococcus pyogenes},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {25--34},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Streptococcus pyogenes biofilm growth in vitro and in vivo and its role in colonization, virulence, and genetic exchange},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiu058},
  volume       = {210},
  year         = {2014},
}