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Gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the development of murine transfusion-related acute lung injury

Kapur, Rick LU ; Kim, Michael ; Rebetz, Johan LU ; Hallström, Björn LU ; Björkman, Jonas T ; Takabe-French, Alisa ; Kim, Noel ; Liu, Jonathan ; Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan and Milosevic, Stefan , et al. (2018) In Blood Advances 2(13). p.1651-1663
Abstract

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress upon blood transfusion and is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities. Whether the gut microbiota plays any role in the development of TRALI is currently unknown. We observed that untreated barrier-free (BF) mice suffered from severe antibody-mediated acute lung injury, whereas the more sterile housed specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice were both protected from lung injury. The prevention of TRALI in the SPF mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice was associated with decreased plasma macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels as well as decreased pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. DNA sequencing of amplicons of the 16S... (More)

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress upon blood transfusion and is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities. Whether the gut microbiota plays any role in the development of TRALI is currently unknown. We observed that untreated barrier-free (BF) mice suffered from severe antibody-mediated acute lung injury, whereas the more sterile housed specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice were both protected from lung injury. The prevention of TRALI in the SPF mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice was associated with decreased plasma macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels as well as decreased pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. DNA sequencing of amplicons of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed a varying gastrointestinal bacterial composition between BF and SPF mice. BF fecal matter transferred into SPF mice significantly restored TRALI susceptibility in SPF mice. These data reveal a link between the gut flora composition and the development of antibody-mediated TRALI in mice. Assessment of gut microbial composition may help in TRALI risk assessment before transfusion.

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Blood Advances
volume
2
issue
13
pages
1651 - 1663
publisher
American Society of Hematology
external identifiers
  • pmid:29991496
  • scopus:85055233556
ISSN
2473-9529
DOI
10.1182/bloodadvances.2018018903
language
English
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yes
id
d6cb0f0d-9f0d-4abd-9b45-fc05b997f481
date added to LUP
2018-08-06 16:24:36
date last changed
2020-09-16 03:52:36
@article{d6cb0f0d-9f0d-4abd-9b45-fc05b997f481,
  abstract     = {<p>Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress upon blood transfusion and is the leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities. Whether the gut microbiota plays any role in the development of TRALI is currently unknown. We observed that untreated barrier-free (BF) mice suffered from severe antibody-mediated acute lung injury, whereas the more sterile housed specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice were both protected from lung injury. The prevention of TRALI in the SPF mice and gut flora-depleted BF mice was associated with decreased plasma macrophage inflammatory protein-2 levels as well as decreased pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. DNA sequencing of amplicons of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed a varying gastrointestinal bacterial composition between BF and SPF mice. BF fecal matter transferred into SPF mice significantly restored TRALI susceptibility in SPF mice. These data reveal a link between the gut flora composition and the development of antibody-mediated TRALI in mice. Assessment of gut microbial composition may help in TRALI risk assessment before transfusion.</p>},
  author       = {Kapur, Rick and Kim, Michael and Rebetz, Johan and Hallström, Björn and Björkman, Jonas T and Takabe-French, Alisa and Kim, Noel and Liu, Jonathan and Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan and Milosevic, Stefan and McVey, Mark J and Speck, Edwin R and Semple, John W},
  issn         = {2473-9529},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {1651--1663},
  publisher    = {American Society of Hematology},
  series       = {Blood Advances},
  title        = {Gastrointestinal microbiota contributes to the development of murine transfusion-related acute lung injury},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2018018903},
  doi          = {10.1182/bloodadvances.2018018903},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2018},
}