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Cancer risks in childhood and adolescence among the offspring of immigrants to Sweden

Hemminki, Kari LU and Li, Xinjun LU (2002) In British Journal of Cancer 86(9). p.8-1414
Abstract

We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The... (More)

We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The highest risk was noted for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among young offspring (0-4 years) of two Turkish parents (6.87). The currently available limited data on rates for childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in these countries do not explain the risk in the offspring of immigrants. Yugoslavs and Turks are recent immigrant groups to Sweden, and their offspring have been subject to much population mixing, perhaps leading to recurring infections and immunological stimulation, which may contribute to their excess of lymphomas.

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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Asia/ethnology, Child, Child, Preschool, Databases, Factual, Emigration and Immigration, Epidemiologic Studies, Europe/ethnology, Female, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Leukemia/epidemiology, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/epidemiology, Male, Nervous System Neoplasms/epidemiology, Risk Factors, Sweden/epidemiology, Turkey/ethnology, United States/ethnology, Yugoslavia/ethnology
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
86
issue
9
pages
5 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:11986773
  • scopus:0037029730
ISSN
0007-0920
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjc.6600227
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
d7d5a0ff-7e29-4b95-8bef-08232cb38f26
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:59:37
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:45:53
@article{d7d5a0ff-7e29-4b95-8bef-08232cb38f26,
  abstract     = {<p>We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The highest risk was noted for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among young offspring (0-4 years) of two Turkish parents (6.87). The currently available limited data on rates for childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in these countries do not explain the risk in the offspring of immigrants. Yugoslavs and Turks are recent immigrant groups to Sweden, and their offspring have been subject to much population mixing, perhaps leading to recurring infections and immunological stimulation, which may contribute to their excess of lymphomas.</p>},
  author       = {Hemminki, Kari and Li, Xinjun},
  issn         = {0007-0920},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {8--1414},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Cancer risks in childhood and adolescence among the offspring of immigrants to Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6600227},
  doi          = {10.1038/sj.bjc.6600227},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2002},
}