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Effects of a randomized, culturally adapted, lifestyle intervention on mental health among Middle-Eastern immigrants

Siddiqui, Faiza LU ; Lindblad, Ulf LU ; Nilsson, Peter M LU and Bennet, Louise LU (2019) In European Journal of Public Health
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Middle-Eastern immigrants in Sweden are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and poor mental health. Physical activity not only prevents/delays onset of T2D but also shows favorable effects on mental health. However, the effects of a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on mental health among Middle-Eastern immigrants have not been explored before. We aimed to study the effects of a randomized controlled, culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on anxiety and depression levels in diabetes-prone Iraqi immigrants.

METHODS: Participants (n = 96) were randomized to intervention group, IG (n = 50) or control group, CG (n = 46). The IG received seven group sessions addressing lifestyle change and the CG... (More)

BACKGROUND: Middle-Eastern immigrants in Sweden are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and poor mental health. Physical activity not only prevents/delays onset of T2D but also shows favorable effects on mental health. However, the effects of a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on mental health among Middle-Eastern immigrants have not been explored before. We aimed to study the effects of a randomized controlled, culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on anxiety and depression levels in diabetes-prone Iraqi immigrants.

METHODS: Participants (n = 96) were randomized to intervention group, IG (n = 50) or control group, CG (n = 46). The IG received seven group sessions addressing lifestyle change and the CG received treatment as usual. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) assessed mental health at start, mid (2 months) and end of the study (4 months). Proportional odds ratio (OR) model was used to study the effect of the intervention.

RESULTS: The odds of scoring lower on MADRS-S and HADS depression scale at visit 3 vs. baseline were higher in the IG compared to the CG (MADRS-S OR 5.9, 95% CI: 1.6-22.5; HADS OR 4.4, 95% CI: 0.9-20.3). The findings persisted after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, time since migration, sedentary lifestyle and language spoken at home. Group differences were non-significant at visit 2 vs. baseline.

CONCLUSION: A culturally adapted lifestyle intervention addressing T2D prevention in Middle-Eastern immigrants has favorable effects on mental health. The effect was more pronounced at the 4 months than at 2 months follow-up, indicating beneficial effect of longer study duration.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01420198.

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epub
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European Journal of Public Health
publisher
Oxford University Press
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
10.1093/eurpub/ckz020
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dcceef27-a459-401a-8faa-ad89adcb9a38
date added to LUP
2019-03-29 13:55:01
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2019-04-05 14:20:59
@article{dcceef27-a459-401a-8faa-ad89adcb9a38,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Middle-Eastern immigrants in Sweden are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and poor mental health. Physical activity not only prevents/delays onset of T2D but also shows favorable effects on mental health. However, the effects of a culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on mental health among Middle-Eastern immigrants have not been explored before. We aimed to study the effects of a randomized controlled, culturally adapted lifestyle intervention on anxiety and depression levels in diabetes-prone Iraqi immigrants.</p><p>METHODS: Participants (n = 96) were randomized to intervention group, IG (n = 50) or control group, CG (n = 46). The IG received seven group sessions addressing lifestyle change and the CG received treatment as usual. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-S) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) assessed mental health at start, mid (2 months) and end of the study (4 months). Proportional odds ratio (OR) model was used to study the effect of the intervention.</p><p>RESULTS: The odds of scoring lower on MADRS-S and HADS depression scale at visit 3 vs. baseline were higher in the IG compared to the CG (MADRS-S OR 5.9, 95% CI: 1.6-22.5; HADS OR 4.4, 95% CI: 0.9-20.3). The findings persisted after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, time since migration, sedentary lifestyle and language spoken at home. Group differences were non-significant at visit 2 vs. baseline.</p><p>CONCLUSION: A culturally adapted lifestyle intervention addressing T2D prevention in Middle-Eastern immigrants has favorable effects on mental health. The effect was more pronounced at the 4 months than at 2 months follow-up, indicating beneficial effect of longer study duration.</p><p>TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01420198.</p>},
  author       = {Siddiqui, Faiza and Lindblad, Ulf and Nilsson, Peter M and Bennet, Louise},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Effects of a randomized, culturally adapted, lifestyle intervention on mental health among Middle-Eastern immigrants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckz020},
  year         = {2019},
}