Advanced

Risk of being born preterm in offspring of survivors with childhood or adolescent central nervous system tumour in Sweden

Huang, Wuqing LU ; Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Sundquist, Jan LU ; Crump, Casey LU and Ji, Jianguang LU (2019) In International Journal of Cancer
Abstract

An increasing number of patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumour could survive to reproductive age. However, it is largely unknown whether the history of CNS tumour might affect pregnancy outcome. We aimed to explore the risk of being born pretem among children of CNS tumour survivors. By linking several nationwide registers in Sweden, we identified 1369 children whose parents were childhood or adolescent CNS tumour survivors. Children whose parents did not have CNS tumour were matched randomly with a 5:1 ratio to generate the reference group. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The prevalence of preterm birth (PTB) was 6.9% among children of survivors with... (More)

An increasing number of patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumour could survive to reproductive age. However, it is largely unknown whether the history of CNS tumour might affect pregnancy outcome. We aimed to explore the risk of being born pretem among children of CNS tumour survivors. By linking several nationwide registers in Sweden, we identified 1369 children whose parents were childhood or adolescent CNS tumour survivors. Children whose parents did not have CNS tumour were matched randomly with a 5:1 ratio to generate the reference group. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The prevalence of preterm birth (PTB) was 6.9% among children of survivors with CNS tumour and 5.2% among the matched controls. Children of survivors had an increased risk of PTB (adjusted OR=1.29, 95%CI 1.01-1.65) compared to the matched controls. This risk was increased specifically among offspring of those diagnosed in childhood (adjusted OR=1.53, 95%CI 1.14-2.06) but not adolescence (adjusted OR=0.89, 95%CI 0.56-1.41). For families with more than one child, the risk was slightly lower among the second child as compared to the first child. The risk was negatively associated with time interval between parental diagnosis and childbirth. Parental medulloblastoma and ependymoma were most strongly associated with a higher risk of PTB. Children of survivors with CNS tumour experienced an elevated risk of PTB. However, the risk diminishes gradually following parental diagnosis of CNS tumour. Offspring of childhood CNS tumour survivors and medulloblastoma or ependymoma survivors may have the highest risk of PTB. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
International Journal of Cancer
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:31595491
  • scopus:85074510088
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.32722
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
id
dd6a3037-9bc4-4801-8be6-7f9e4fb000bd
date added to LUP
2019-10-24 11:10:12
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:28:46
@article{dd6a3037-9bc4-4801-8be6-7f9e4fb000bd,
  abstract     = {<p>An increasing number of patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumour could survive to reproductive age. However, it is largely unknown whether the history of CNS tumour might affect pregnancy outcome. We aimed to explore the risk of being born pretem among children of CNS tumour survivors. By linking several nationwide registers in Sweden, we identified 1369 children whose parents were childhood or adolescent CNS tumour survivors. Children whose parents did not have CNS tumour were matched randomly with a 5:1 ratio to generate the reference group. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The prevalence of preterm birth (PTB) was 6.9% among children of survivors with CNS tumour and 5.2% among the matched controls. Children of survivors had an increased risk of PTB (adjusted OR=1.29, 95%CI 1.01-1.65) compared to the matched controls. This risk was increased specifically among offspring of those diagnosed in childhood (adjusted OR=1.53, 95%CI 1.14-2.06) but not adolescence (adjusted OR=0.89, 95%CI 0.56-1.41). For families with more than one child, the risk was slightly lower among the second child as compared to the first child. The risk was negatively associated with time interval between parental diagnosis and childbirth. Parental medulloblastoma and ependymoma were most strongly associated with a higher risk of PTB. Children of survivors with CNS tumour experienced an elevated risk of PTB. However, the risk diminishes gradually following parental diagnosis of CNS tumour. Offspring of childhood CNS tumour survivors and medulloblastoma or ependymoma survivors may have the highest risk of PTB. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p>},
  author       = {Huang, Wuqing and Sundquist, Kristina and Sundquist, Jan and Crump, Casey and Ji, Jianguang},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Risk of being born preterm in offspring of survivors with childhood or adolescent central nervous system tumour in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32722},
  doi          = {10.1002/ijc.32722},
  year         = {2019},
}