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Familial multiple primary lung cancers : a population-based analysis from Sweden

Li, Xinjun LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2005) In Lung Cancer 47(3). p.7-301
Abstract

Multiple primary cancers arise because of inherited or acquired deficiencies, and their causes may depend on the first primary cancer, or they may be entirely independent. We used a nation-wide family dataset to search for evidence for a genetic predisposition to lung cancer. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later with their parents, totalling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for first and second primary lung cancers by a family history. The incidence of second primary lung cancer was nine times higher among cases with familial lung cancer... (More)

Multiple primary cancers arise because of inherited or acquired deficiencies, and their causes may depend on the first primary cancer, or they may be entirely independent. We used a nation-wide family dataset to search for evidence for a genetic predisposition to lung cancer. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later with their parents, totalling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for first and second primary lung cancers by a family history. The incidence of second primary lung cancer was nine times higher among cases with familial lung cancer compare to that of first primary lung cancer. The proportion of multiple primary lung cancer patients with family history for lung cancer was 4.7% (9/190) for men and 6.5% (5/77) for women. Lung cancer patients with a family history of lung cancer were at a significantly increased risk for subsequent primary lung cancer among both men (SIR=9.89, 95%CI 4.48-18.66) and women (SIR=17.86, 95%CI 5.63-42.00). The corresponding SIRs in patients without a family history were 2.04 (95%CI 1.75-2.36) and 5.10 (95%CI 3.99-6.43) for men and women, respectively. The present study suggests that the development from the first primary lung cancer to the second primary lung cancer may be more strongly affected by genetic factor than the first primary lung cancer.

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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Aged, Databases, Factual, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Incidence, Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Second Primary/genetics, Pedigree, Registries/statistics & numerical data, Sweden/epidemiology
in
Lung Cancer
volume
47
issue
3
pages
7 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:13844299715
ISSN
0169-5002
DOI
10.1016/j.lungcan.2004.07.048
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
ddcda5d4-8856-4608-984d-37352e1f4ae2
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:41:06
date last changed
2019-03-05 04:31:16
@article{ddcda5d4-8856-4608-984d-37352e1f4ae2,
  abstract     = {<p>Multiple primary cancers arise because of inherited or acquired deficiencies, and their causes may depend on the first primary cancer, or they may be entirely independent. We used a nation-wide family dataset to search for evidence for a genetic predisposition to lung cancer. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database includes all Swedes born in 1932 and later with their parents, totalling over 10.2 million individuals. Cancer cases were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Registry up to year 2000. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence limits (CI) were calculated for first and second primary lung cancers by a family history. The incidence of second primary lung cancer was nine times higher among cases with familial lung cancer compare to that of first primary lung cancer. The proportion of multiple primary lung cancer patients with family history for lung cancer was 4.7% (9/190) for men and 6.5% (5/77) for women. Lung cancer patients with a family history of lung cancer were at a significantly increased risk for subsequent primary lung cancer among both men (SIR=9.89, 95%CI 4.48-18.66) and women (SIR=17.86, 95%CI 5.63-42.00). The corresponding SIRs in patients without a family history were 2.04 (95%CI 1.75-2.36) and 5.10 (95%CI 3.99-6.43) for men and women, respectively. The present study suggests that the development from the first primary lung cancer to the second primary lung cancer may be more strongly affected by genetic factor than the first primary lung cancer.</p>},
  author       = {Li, Xinjun and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {0169-5002},
  keyword      = {Adult,Aged,Databases, Factual,Female,Genetic Predisposition to Disease,Humans,Incidence,Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology,Male,Middle Aged,Neoplasms, Second Primary/genetics,Pedigree,Registries/statistics & numerical data,Sweden/epidemiology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {7--301},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Lung Cancer},
  title        = {Familial multiple primary lung cancers : a population-based analysis from Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2004.07.048},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2005},
}