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ICU-recovery in Scandinavia : a comparative study of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

Egerod, Ingrid ; Risom, Signe S ; Thomsen, Thordis LU ; Storli, Sissel L ; Eskerud, Ragne S ; Holme, Anny N and Samuelson, Karin A M LU (2013) In Intensive & Critical Care Nursing 29(2). p.11-103
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to describe and compare models of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden to help inform clinicians regarding the establishment and continuation of ICU aftercare programmes.

METHODS: Our study had a multi-centre comparative qualitative design with triangulation of sources, methods and investigators. We combined prospective data from semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews and unreported data from a precursory investigation.

RESULTS: Four basic models of follow-up were identified representing nurse-led or multidisciplinary programmes with or without the provision of patient diaries. A conceptual model was constructed including a catalogue of interventions related... (More)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to describe and compare models of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden to help inform clinicians regarding the establishment and continuation of ICU aftercare programmes.

METHODS: Our study had a multi-centre comparative qualitative design with triangulation of sources, methods and investigators. We combined prospective data from semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews and unreported data from a precursory investigation.

RESULTS: Four basic models of follow-up were identified representing nurse-led or multidisciplinary programmes with or without the provision of patient diaries. A conceptual model was constructed including a catalogue of interventions related to the illness trajectory. We identified three temporal areas for follow-up directed towards the past, present or future.

CONCLUSIONS: ICU follow-up programmes in the Scandinavian countries have evolved as bottom-up initiatives conducted on a semi-voluntary basis. We suggest reframing follow-up as an integral part of patient therapy. The Scandinavian programmes focus on the human experience of critical illness, with more attention to understanding the past than looking towards the future. We recommend harmonization of programmes with clear goals enabling programme assessment, while moving towards a paradigm of empowerment, enabling patient and family to take an active role in their recovery and wellbeing.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Continuity of Patient Care/standards, Critical Care/psychology, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Models, Nursing, Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
in
Intensive & Critical Care Nursing
volume
29
issue
2
pages
11 - 103
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:23340012
ISSN
1532-4036
DOI
10.1016/j.iccn.2012.10.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
df9589bb-9959-4812-b79f-a7d7e4b98630
date added to LUP
2018-11-19 15:47:04
date last changed
2019-11-19 04:01:18
@article{df9589bb-9959-4812-b79f-a7d7e4b98630,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to describe and compare models of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden to help inform clinicians regarding the establishment and continuation of ICU aftercare programmes.</p><p>METHODS: Our study had a multi-centre comparative qualitative design with triangulation of sources, methods and investigators. We combined prospective data from semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews and unreported data from a precursory investigation.</p><p>RESULTS: Four basic models of follow-up were identified representing nurse-led or multidisciplinary programmes with or without the provision of patient diaries. A conceptual model was constructed including a catalogue of interventions related to the illness trajectory. We identified three temporal areas for follow-up directed towards the past, present or future.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: ICU follow-up programmes in the Scandinavian countries have evolved as bottom-up initiatives conducted on a semi-voluntary basis. We suggest reframing follow-up as an integral part of patient therapy. The Scandinavian programmes focus on the human experience of critical illness, with more attention to understanding the past than looking towards the future. We recommend harmonization of programmes with clear goals enabling programme assessment, while moving towards a paradigm of empowerment, enabling patient and family to take an active role in their recovery and wellbeing.</p>},
  author       = {Egerod, Ingrid and Risom, Signe S and Thomsen, Thordis and Storli, Sissel L and Eskerud, Ragne S and Holme, Anny N and Samuelson, Karin A M},
  issn         = {1532-4036},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {11--103},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Intensive & Critical Care Nursing},
  title        = {ICU-recovery in Scandinavia : a comparative study of intensive care follow-up in Denmark, Norway and Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2012.10.005},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.iccn.2012.10.005},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2013},
}