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Carbon footprint of urban source separation for nutrient recovery

Kjerstadius, H. LU ; Bernstad Saraiva, A.; Spångberg, J. and Davidsson, Å. LU (2017) In Journal of Environmental Management 197. p.250-257
Abstract

Source separation systems for the management of domestic wastewater and food waste has been suggested as more sustainable sanitation systems for urban areas. The present study used an attributional life cycle assessment to investigate the carbon footprint and potential for nutrient recovery of two sanitation systems for a hypothetical urban area in Southern Sweden. The systems represented a typical Swedish conventional system and a possible source separation system with increased nutrient recovery. The assessment included the management chain from household collection, transport, treatment and final return of nutrients to agriculture or disposal of the residuals. The results for carbon footprint and nutrient recovery (phosphorus and... (More)

Source separation systems for the management of domestic wastewater and food waste has been suggested as more sustainable sanitation systems for urban areas. The present study used an attributional life cycle assessment to investigate the carbon footprint and potential for nutrient recovery of two sanitation systems for a hypothetical urban area in Southern Sweden. The systems represented a typical Swedish conventional system and a possible source separation system with increased nutrient recovery. The assessment included the management chain from household collection, transport, treatment and final return of nutrients to agriculture or disposal of the residuals. The results for carbon footprint and nutrient recovery (phosphorus and nitrogen) concluded that the source separation system could increase nutrient recovery (0.30–0.38 kg P capita−1 year−1 and 3.10–3.28 kg N capita−1 year−1), while decreasing the carbon footprint (−24 to −58 kg CO2-eq. capita−1 year−1), compared to the conventional system. The nutrient recovery was increased by the use of struvite precipitation and ammonium stripping at the wastewater treatment plant. The carbon footprint decreased, mainly due to the increased biogas production, increased replacement of mineral fertilizer in agriculture and less emissions of nitrous oxide from wastewater treatment. In conclusion, the study showed that source separation systems could potentially be used to increase nutrient recovery from urban areas, while decreasing the climate impact.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carbon footprint, Food waste, Life cycle assessment, Nutrient recovery, Source separation, Wastewater management
in
Journal of Environmental Management
volume
197
pages
8 pages
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:85017025634
  • wos:000401880100025
ISSN
0301-4797
DOI
10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.03.094
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e0ae2276-e5d9-48fe-8a53-12bb4b9ec03b
date added to LUP
2017-04-26 09:55:33
date last changed
2017-09-18 13:33:11
@article{e0ae2276-e5d9-48fe-8a53-12bb4b9ec03b,
  abstract     = {<p>Source separation systems for the management of domestic wastewater and food waste has been suggested as more sustainable sanitation systems for urban areas. The present study used an attributional life cycle assessment to investigate the carbon footprint and potential for nutrient recovery of two sanitation systems for a hypothetical urban area in Southern Sweden. The systems represented a typical Swedish conventional system and a possible source separation system with increased nutrient recovery. The assessment included the management chain from household collection, transport, treatment and final return of nutrients to agriculture or disposal of the residuals. The results for carbon footprint and nutrient recovery (phosphorus and nitrogen) concluded that the source separation system could increase nutrient recovery (0.30–0.38 kg P capita<sup>−1</sup> year<sup>−1</sup> and 3.10–3.28 kg N capita<sup>−1</sup> year<sup>−1</sup>), while decreasing the carbon footprint (−24 to −58 kg CO<sub>2</sub>-eq. capita<sup>−1</sup> year<sup>−1</sup>), compared to the conventional system. The nutrient recovery was increased by the use of struvite precipitation and ammonium stripping at the wastewater treatment plant. The carbon footprint decreased, mainly due to the increased biogas production, increased replacement of mineral fertilizer in agriculture and less emissions of nitrous oxide from wastewater treatment. In conclusion, the study showed that source separation systems could potentially be used to increase nutrient recovery from urban areas, while decreasing the climate impact.</p>},
  author       = {Kjerstadius, H. and Bernstad Saraiva, A. and Spångberg, J. and Davidsson, Å.},
  issn         = {0301-4797},
  keyword      = {Carbon footprint,Food waste,Life cycle assessment,Nutrient recovery,Source separation,Wastewater management},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  pages        = {250--257},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Journal of Environmental Management},
  title        = {Carbon footprint of urban source separation for nutrient recovery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.03.094},
  volume       = {197},
  year         = {2017},
}