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Dearterialization of colorectal liver cancer : Institutional experience

Ohlsson, B. LU ; Lindell, G. LU ; Lundstedt, C. LU ; Jeppsson, B. LU ; Persson, B.; Bengmark, S. LU and Tranberg, K. G. LU (1999) In Digestive Surgery 16(3). p.229-235
Abstract

Background/Aims: Preliminary clinical trials have suggested that dearterialization (interruption of arterial blood supply) is beneficial to patients with liver tumours. The aim of this report was to review the outcome of all patients undergoing dearterialization for colorectal liver metastases and to analyze whether refinement of the technique was followed by improvement in outcome. Methods: Retrospective review of 57 patients undergoing temporary (16 h) dearterialization during 1972-1984 (n = 24) or repeated transient dearterialization (1-2 h once or twice daily) during 1985-1995 (n = 33). Results: The median survival after start of treatment was 1.1 years, and the 5-year survival rate was 0%. There was no significant difference in... (More)

Background/Aims: Preliminary clinical trials have suggested that dearterialization (interruption of arterial blood supply) is beneficial to patients with liver tumours. The aim of this report was to review the outcome of all patients undergoing dearterialization for colorectal liver metastases and to analyze whether refinement of the technique was followed by improvement in outcome. Methods: Retrospective review of 57 patients undergoing temporary (16 h) dearterialization during 1972-1984 (n = 24) or repeated transient dearterialization (1-2 h once or twice daily) during 1985-1995 (n = 33). Results: The median survival after start of treatment was 1.1 years, and the 5-year survival rate was 0%. There was no significant difference in survival between temporary and repeated transient dearterialization. Liver tumour volume and extrahepatic metastases varied negatively with survival. The temporary dearterialization procedure was followed by hepatic or intra-abdominal abscess formation in 6 patients (24%), leading to postoperative death in 2 patients (operative mortality 8%). Complications after repeated transient dearterialization were related mainly to technical problems with the occluder device. Conclusion: Although this was not a randomized study, it appears that dearterialization is of no benefit in colorectal liver cancer.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Dearterialization, Ischaemic therapy, Liver neoplasm, Metastases, colorectal
in
Digestive Surgery
volume
16
issue
3
pages
7 pages
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032777858
ISSN
0253-4886
DOI
10.1159/000018713
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4a67517-6e82-4bb4-aa0f-339e1866527a
date added to LUP
2019-06-15 16:48:45
date last changed
2019-08-16 14:12:23
@article{e4a67517-6e82-4bb4-aa0f-339e1866527a,
  abstract     = {<p>Background/Aims: Preliminary clinical trials have suggested that dearterialization (interruption of arterial blood supply) is beneficial to patients with liver tumours. The aim of this report was to review the outcome of all patients undergoing dearterialization for colorectal liver metastases and to analyze whether refinement of the technique was followed by improvement in outcome. Methods: Retrospective review of 57 patients undergoing temporary (16 h) dearterialization during 1972-1984 (n = 24) or repeated transient dearterialization (1-2 h once or twice daily) during 1985-1995 (n = 33). Results: The median survival after start of treatment was 1.1 years, and the 5-year survival rate was 0%. There was no significant difference in survival between temporary and repeated transient dearterialization. Liver tumour volume and extrahepatic metastases varied negatively with survival. The temporary dearterialization procedure was followed by hepatic or intra-abdominal abscess formation in 6 patients (24%), leading to postoperative death in 2 patients (operative mortality 8%). Complications after repeated transient dearterialization were related mainly to technical problems with the occluder device. Conclusion: Although this was not a randomized study, it appears that dearterialization is of no benefit in colorectal liver cancer.</p>},
  author       = {Ohlsson, B. and Lindell, G. and Lundstedt, C. and Jeppsson, B. and Persson, B. and Bengmark, S. and Tranberg, K. G.},
  issn         = {0253-4886},
  keyword      = {Dearterialization,Ischaemic therapy,Liver neoplasm,Metastases, colorectal},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {229--235},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Digestive Surgery},
  title        = {Dearterialization of colorectal liver cancer : Institutional experience},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000018713},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {1999},
}