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Validation a portable monitoring device for sleep apnea diagnosis in a population based cohort using synchronized home polysomnography

Zou, Ding; Grote, Ludger; Peker, Yuksel; Lindblad, Ulf LU and Hedner, Jan (2006) In Sleep 29(3). p.367-374
Abstract
Subject Objective: To assess the accuracy of a portable monitoring device based on peripheral arterial tonometry to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To propose a new standard for limited-channel device validation using synchronized polysomnography (PSG) home recordings and a population-based cohort. Design: Single-night, unattended PSG and Watch_PAT 100 (WP_100). Setting: Home environment. Participants: Ninety-eight subjects (55 men; age, 60 7 year; body mass index, 28 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) consecutively recruited from the Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project. Measurements and Results: The WP_100 records peripheral arterial tone, heart rate, oxygen saturation and actigraphy for automatic analysis of respiratory disturbance index... (More)
Subject Objective: To assess the accuracy of a portable monitoring device based on peripheral arterial tonometry to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To propose a new standard for limited-channel device validation using synchronized polysomnography (PSG) home recordings and a population-based cohort. Design: Single-night, unattended PSG and Watch_PAT 100 (WP_100). Setting: Home environment. Participants: Ninety-eight subjects (55 men; age, 60 7 year; body mass index, 28 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) consecutively recruited from the Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project. Measurements and Results: The WP_100 records peripheral arterial tone, heart rate, oxygen saturation and actigraphy for automatic analysis of respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and sleep-wake state. The accuracy of WP_100 in RDI, AHI, ODI, and sleep-wake detection was assessed by comparison with data from simultaneous PSG recordings. The mean PSG-AHl in this population was 25.5 +/- 22.9 events per hour. The WP_100 RDI, AHI, and ODI correlated closely (0.88, 0.90, and 0.92; p < .0001, respectively) with the corresponding indexes obtained by PSG. The areas under the curve for the receiver-operator characteristic curves for WP_100 AHI and RDI were 0.93 and 0.90 for the PSG-AHl and RDI thresholds 10 and 20 (p < .0001, respectively). The agreement of the sleep-wake assessment based on 30-second bins between the 2 systems was 82 +/- 7%. Conclusions: The WP_100 was reasonably accurate for unattended home diagnosis of OSA in a population sample not preselected for OSA symptoms. The current design, including simultaneous home PSG recordings in population-based cohorts, is proposed as a reasonable validation standard for assessment of simplified recording tools for OSA diagnosis. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
polysomnography recording, sleep apnea, peripheral arterial tone, home, diagnostic device
in
Sleep
volume
29
issue
3
pages
367 - 374
publisher
Asoociated Professional Sleep Societies
external identifiers
  • wos:000240123600013
  • pmid:16553023
  • scopus:33745785255
ISSN
0161-8105
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e6fb6754-599d-421d-876f-0088659020b5 (old id 686224)
alternative location
http://www.journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?citationid=2876
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16553023?dopt=Citation
date added to LUP
2008-01-06 11:32:10
date last changed
2019-09-17 01:47:56
@article{e6fb6754-599d-421d-876f-0088659020b5,
  abstract     = {Subject Objective: To assess the accuracy of a portable monitoring device based on peripheral arterial tonometry to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To propose a new standard for limited-channel device validation using synchronized polysomnography (PSG) home recordings and a population-based cohort. Design: Single-night, unattended PSG and Watch_PAT 100 (WP_100). Setting: Home environment. Participants: Ninety-eight subjects (55 men; age, 60 7 year; body mass index, 28 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) consecutively recruited from the Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project. Measurements and Results: The WP_100 records peripheral arterial tone, heart rate, oxygen saturation and actigraphy for automatic analysis of respiratory disturbance index (RDI), apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and sleep-wake state. The accuracy of WP_100 in RDI, AHI, ODI, and sleep-wake detection was assessed by comparison with data from simultaneous PSG recordings. The mean PSG-AHl in this population was 25.5 +/- 22.9 events per hour. The WP_100 RDI, AHI, and ODI correlated closely (0.88, 0.90, and 0.92; p &lt; .0001, respectively) with the corresponding indexes obtained by PSG. The areas under the curve for the receiver-operator characteristic curves for WP_100 AHI and RDI were 0.93 and 0.90 for the PSG-AHl and RDI thresholds 10 and 20 (p &lt; .0001, respectively). The agreement of the sleep-wake assessment based on 30-second bins between the 2 systems was 82 +/- 7%. Conclusions: The WP_100 was reasonably accurate for unattended home diagnosis of OSA in a population sample not preselected for OSA symptoms. The current design, including simultaneous home PSG recordings in population-based cohorts, is proposed as a reasonable validation standard for assessment of simplified recording tools for OSA diagnosis.},
  author       = {Zou, Ding and Grote, Ludger and Peker, Yuksel and Lindblad, Ulf and Hedner, Jan},
  issn         = {0161-8105},
  keyword      = {polysomnography recording,sleep apnea,peripheral arterial tone,home,diagnostic device},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {367--374},
  publisher    = {Asoociated Professional Sleep Societies},
  series       = {Sleep},
  title        = {Validation a portable monitoring device for sleep apnea diagnosis in a population based cohort using synchronized home polysomnography},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2006},
}