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Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are associated with osteopenia but not with pain at diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis : Data from the BARFOT cohort

Hafström, Ingiäld; Ajeganova, Sofia; Forslind, Kristina LU and Svensson, Björn LU (2019) In Arthritis Research and Therapy 21(1).
Abstract

Background: Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) have been suggested to have a potential role in both bone loss and pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), based on studies in vitro and in animal models. Here we addressed if anti-cyclic citrullinated (anti-CCP) antibodies were associated with osteopenia or pain in patients with RA, at the time for diagnosis. Methods: Baseline data from the BARFOT (Better Anti-Rheumatic PharmacOTherapy) cohort, which consists of patients with RA with a disease duration of 1 year or less, were analyzed. To be included, they should have been assessed by anti-CCP, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) of lumbar spine and hip, and/or digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) of the metacarpal bones. Osteopenia... (More)

Background: Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) have been suggested to have a potential role in both bone loss and pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), based on studies in vitro and in animal models. Here we addressed if anti-cyclic citrullinated (anti-CCP) antibodies were associated with osteopenia or pain in patients with RA, at the time for diagnosis. Methods: Baseline data from the BARFOT (Better Anti-Rheumatic PharmacOTherapy) cohort, which consists of patients with RA with a disease duration of 1 year or less, were analyzed. To be included, they should have been assessed by anti-CCP, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) of lumbar spine and hip, and/or digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) of the metacarpal bones. Osteopenia was defined as a z-score < - 1 SD. Pain VAS > 40 mm, was defined as patient unacceptable pain. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess whether anti-CCP was independently associated with osteopenia or unacceptable pain. Results: Of the 657 patients, 65% were women, 58% were anti-CCP positive, 37% had osteopenia in the lumbar spine, and 29% had osteopenia in the hip. Sixty-one percent had unacceptable pain at diagnosis. Patients positive for anti-CCP had significantly more frequently osteopenia in the femoral neck and Ward's triangle compared with anti-CCP-negative patients (p = 0.016 and 0.003, respectively). This difference was found in men at any anti-CCP titer, but in women, osteopenia in these hip locations was found only in those with high anti-CCP titers (> 500 IU/ml). Anti-CCP was not associated with osteopenia in the lumbar spine or the metacarpal bones. In multiple logistic regression analyses, anti-CCP was independently associated with osteopenia in the femoral neck and/or Ward's triangle but not with unacceptable pain. Instead, inflammatory variables were independently associated with unacceptable pain. Conclusion: These data show that in patients with early RA, anti-CCP positivity was independently associated with osteopenia in the femoral neck and/or Ward, but not in the lumbar spine. In our patients, we could not confirm a recently suggested association between anti-CCP antibodies and pain. Further studies are necessary to explore the possible clinical relevance of interactions between ACPA, bone, and pain found in vitro and in animal models.

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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, Bone mineral density, Pain, Rheumatoid arthritis
in
Arthritis Research and Therapy
volume
21
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85061053959
ISSN
1478-6354
DOI
10.1186/s13075-019-1833-y
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e9ddce63-8a2d-4185-8e9b-3809e9d67d4e
date added to LUP
2019-02-11 12:19:16
date last changed
2019-03-12 04:21:00
@article{e9ddce63-8a2d-4185-8e9b-3809e9d67d4e,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) have been suggested to have a potential role in both bone loss and pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), based on studies in vitro and in animal models. Here we addressed if anti-cyclic citrullinated (anti-CCP) antibodies were associated with osteopenia or pain in patients with RA, at the time for diagnosis. Methods: Baseline data from the BARFOT (Better Anti-Rheumatic PharmacOTherapy) cohort, which consists of patients with RA with a disease duration of 1 year or less, were analyzed. To be included, they should have been assessed by anti-CCP, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) of lumbar spine and hip, and/or digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) of the metacarpal bones. Osteopenia was defined as a z-score &lt; - 1 SD. Pain VAS &gt; 40 mm, was defined as patient unacceptable pain. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess whether anti-CCP was independently associated with osteopenia or unacceptable pain. Results: Of the 657 patients, 65% were women, 58% were anti-CCP positive, 37% had osteopenia in the lumbar spine, and 29% had osteopenia in the hip. Sixty-one percent had unacceptable pain at diagnosis. Patients positive for anti-CCP had significantly more frequently osteopenia in the femoral neck and Ward's triangle compared with anti-CCP-negative patients (p = 0.016 and 0.003, respectively). This difference was found in men at any anti-CCP titer, but in women, osteopenia in these hip locations was found only in those with high anti-CCP titers (&gt; 500 IU/ml). Anti-CCP was not associated with osteopenia in the lumbar spine or the metacarpal bones. In multiple logistic regression analyses, anti-CCP was independently associated with osteopenia in the femoral neck and/or Ward's triangle but not with unacceptable pain. Instead, inflammatory variables were independently associated with unacceptable pain. Conclusion: These data show that in patients with early RA, anti-CCP positivity was independently associated with osteopenia in the femoral neck and/or Ward, but not in the lumbar spine. In our patients, we could not confirm a recently suggested association between anti-CCP antibodies and pain. Further studies are necessary to explore the possible clinical relevance of interactions between ACPA, bone, and pain found in vitro and in animal models.</p>},
  articleno    = {45},
  author       = {Hafström, Ingiäld and Ajeganova, Sofia and Forslind, Kristina and Svensson, Björn},
  issn         = {1478-6354},
  keyword      = {Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies,Bone mineral density,Pain,Rheumatoid arthritis},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Arthritis Research and Therapy},
  title        = {Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are associated with osteopenia but not with pain at diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis : Data from the BARFOT cohort},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13075-019-1833-y},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2019},
}