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Fracture-related mortality in southern Sweden : A multiple cause of death analysis, 1998-2014

Kiadaliri, Aliasghar A LU ; Rosengren, Björn E LU and Englund, Martin LU (2017) In Injury
Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess fracture-related mortality among adults (aged ≥20years) in southern Sweden using multiple causes of death approach.

METHODS: All death certificates (n=201 488) in adults recorded in the region of Skåne from 1998 to 2014 were examined. We identified fracture-related deaths and computed mortality rates by sex, age group, and fracture site. Temporal trends were evaluated using joinpoint regression and associated causes were identified by age- and sex-adjusted observed/expected ratios.

RESULTS: Fractures were mentioned on 6 226 (3.1%) death certificates, with majority of these occurred among women (60%) and those aged≥80years (77%). While hip was the most common site overall (61% of all fracture-related... (More)

PURPOSE: To assess fracture-related mortality among adults (aged ≥20years) in southern Sweden using multiple causes of death approach.

METHODS: All death certificates (n=201 488) in adults recorded in the region of Skåne from 1998 to 2014 were examined. We identified fracture-related deaths and computed mortality rates by sex, age group, and fracture site. Temporal trends were evaluated using joinpoint regression and associated causes were identified by age- and sex-adjusted observed/expected ratios.

RESULTS: Fractures were mentioned on 6 226 (3.1%) death certificates, with majority of these occurred among women (60%) and those aged≥80years (77%). While hip was the most common site overall (61% of all fracture-related deaths), skull was the most common site in people <60years (60% of all fracture-related deaths). Proportion of death certificates mentioning fracture was stable in women but increased by 0.4% (95% CI: 0.1 to 0.6) in men between 1998-2002 and 2010-2014. The mean age at death was higher in death certificates mentioning fracture than those without and this gap widened over time. The mean age-standardized fracture-related mortality rate was 18.8 (14.0) per 100 000 person-year in men (women) and declined by 1.5% (1.3%) per year during 1998-2014. Injuries (84.6%) and cardiovascular disorders (64.6%) were the most common comorbidities on death certificates mentioning fracture.

CONCLUSIONS: Fracture is a contributing cause of death in more than 3% of all deaths in southern Sweden with hip in lead among older and skull fracture among younger people. There was a slight increase in proportion of deaths associated with fracture in men but not women during the study period.

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epub
subject
keywords
Journal Article
in
Injury
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85037585552
ISSN
1879-0267
DOI
10.1016/j.injury.2017.12.005
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb9178cc-05f7-4db5-a78c-e83bdd07d8b7
date added to LUP
2017-12-17 16:45:29
date last changed
2018-01-14 04:37:34
@article{eb9178cc-05f7-4db5-a78c-e83bdd07d8b7,
  abstract     = {<p>PURPOSE: To assess fracture-related mortality among adults (aged ≥20years) in southern Sweden using multiple causes of death approach.</p><p>METHODS: All death certificates (n=201 488) in adults recorded in the region of Skåne from 1998 to 2014 were examined. We identified fracture-related deaths and computed mortality rates by sex, age group, and fracture site. Temporal trends were evaluated using joinpoint regression and associated causes were identified by age- and sex-adjusted observed/expected ratios.</p><p>RESULTS: Fractures were mentioned on 6 226 (3.1%) death certificates, with majority of these occurred among women (60%) and those aged≥80years (77%). While hip was the most common site overall (61% of all fracture-related deaths), skull was the most common site in people &lt;60years (60% of all fracture-related deaths). Proportion of death certificates mentioning fracture was stable in women but increased by 0.4% (95% CI: 0.1 to 0.6) in men between 1998-2002 and 2010-2014. The mean age at death was higher in death certificates mentioning fracture than those without and this gap widened over time. The mean age-standardized fracture-related mortality rate was 18.8 (14.0) per 100 000 person-year in men (women) and declined by 1.5% (1.3%) per year during 1998-2014. Injuries (84.6%) and cardiovascular disorders (64.6%) were the most common comorbidities on death certificates mentioning fracture.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Fracture is a contributing cause of death in more than 3% of all deaths in southern Sweden with hip in lead among older and skull fracture among younger people. There was a slight increase in proportion of deaths associated with fracture in men but not women during the study period.</p>},
  author       = {Kiadaliri, Aliasghar A and Rosengren, Björn E and Englund, Martin},
  issn         = {1879-0267},
  keyword      = {Journal Article},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Injury},
  title        = {Fracture-related mortality in southern Sweden : A multiple cause of death analysis, 1998-2014},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2017.12.005},
  year         = {2017},
}