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Diabetes Mellitus and Elevated Copeptin Levels in Middle Age Predict Low Cognitive Speed after Long-Term Follow-Up.

Tufvesson, Eva; Melander, Olle LU ; Minthon, Lennart LU ; Persson, Margaretha LU ; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Struck, Joachim and Nägga, Katarina LU (2013) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 35(1-2). p.67-76
Abstract
Background/Aims: We examined the potential impact of vascular risk factors including copeptin - a robust surrogate marker of arginine vasopressin associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes risk - on future cognitive abilities in a population-based cohort. Methods: Participants (n = 933) were investigated using baseline data, including copeptin levels, and data collected 16 years later using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT). Results: Logistic regression showed that diabetes (OR, 1.86; p < 0.05) and higher copeptin levels (OR, 1.19; p < 0.05) were independently associated with an increased risk of low AQT performance. Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and elevated... (More)
Background/Aims: We examined the potential impact of vascular risk factors including copeptin - a robust surrogate marker of arginine vasopressin associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes risk - on future cognitive abilities in a population-based cohort. Methods: Participants (n = 933) were investigated using baseline data, including copeptin levels, and data collected 16 years later using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT). Results: Logistic regression showed that diabetes (OR, 1.86; p < 0.05) and higher copeptin levels (OR, 1.19; p < 0.05) were independently associated with an increased risk of low AQT performance. Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and elevated copeptin levels in middle age predict lower cognitive speed after long-term follow-up. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
35
issue
1-2
pages
67 - 76
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000317900400006
  • pmid:23364030
  • scopus:84873042113
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000346292
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ebb9f10c-1dd5-4ff3-8e77-a19e791bbad4 (old id 3560440)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23364030?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2013-03-01 09:37:27
date last changed
2019-02-20 02:34:03
@article{ebb9f10c-1dd5-4ff3-8e77-a19e791bbad4,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: We examined the potential impact of vascular risk factors including copeptin - a robust surrogate marker of arginine vasopressin associated with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes risk - on future cognitive abilities in a population-based cohort. Methods: Participants (n = 933) were investigated using baseline data, including copeptin levels, and data collected 16 years later using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT). Results: Logistic regression showed that diabetes (OR, 1.86; p &lt; 0.05) and higher copeptin levels (OR, 1.19; p &lt; 0.05) were independently associated with an increased risk of low AQT performance. Conclusion: Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and elevated copeptin levels in middle age predict lower cognitive speed after long-term follow-up.},
  author       = {Tufvesson, Eva and Melander, Olle and Minthon, Lennart and Persson, Margaretha and Nilsson, Peter and Struck, Joachim and Nägga, Katarina},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {67--76},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Diabetes Mellitus and Elevated Copeptin Levels in Middle Age Predict Low Cognitive Speed after Long-Term Follow-Up.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000346292},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2013},
}