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A new type of solar-system material recovered from Ordovician marine limestone

Schmitz, B. LU ; Yin, Q. Z.; Sanborn, M. E.; Tassinari, M.; Caplan, C. E. and Huss, G. R. (2016) In Nature Communications 7.
Abstract

From mid-Ordovician ∼470 Myr-old limestone >100 fossil L-chondritic meteorites have been recovered, representing the markedly enhanced flux of meteorites to Earth following the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body. Recently one anomalous meteorite, Österplana 065 (Öst 65), was found in the same beds that yield L chondrites. The cosmic-ray exposure age of Öst 65 shows that it may be a fragment of the impactor that broke up the L-chondrite parent body. Here we show that in a chromium versus oxygen-isotope plot Öst 65 falls outside all fields encompassing the known meteorite types. This may be the first documented example of an 'extinct' meteorite, that is, a meteorite type that does not fall on Earth today because its parent body has... (More)

From mid-Ordovician ∼470 Myr-old limestone >100 fossil L-chondritic meteorites have been recovered, representing the markedly enhanced flux of meteorites to Earth following the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body. Recently one anomalous meteorite, Österplana 065 (Öst 65), was found in the same beds that yield L chondrites. The cosmic-ray exposure age of Öst 65 shows that it may be a fragment of the impactor that broke up the L-chondrite parent body. Here we show that in a chromium versus oxygen-isotope plot Öst 65 falls outside all fields encompassing the known meteorite types. This may be the first documented example of an 'extinct' meteorite, that is, a meteorite type that does not fall on Earth today because its parent body has been consumed by collisions. The meteorites found on Earth today apparently do not give a full representation of the kind of bodies in the asteroid belt ∼500 Myr ago.

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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature Communications
volume
7
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:84974727320
  • wos:000378678900001
ISSN
2041-1723
DOI
10.1038/ncomms11851
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ecb7713b-ebea-4123-9e61-04ef50fa567c
date added to LUP
2017-01-23 09:06:34
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:36:54
@article{ecb7713b-ebea-4123-9e61-04ef50fa567c,
  abstract     = {<p>From mid-Ordovician ∼470 Myr-old limestone &gt;100 fossil L-chondritic meteorites have been recovered, representing the markedly enhanced flux of meteorites to Earth following the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body. Recently one anomalous meteorite, Österplana 065 (Öst 65), was found in the same beds that yield L chondrites. The cosmic-ray exposure age of Öst 65 shows that it may be a fragment of the impactor that broke up the L-chondrite parent body. Here we show that in a chromium versus oxygen-isotope plot Öst 65 falls outside all fields encompassing the known meteorite types. This may be the first documented example of an 'extinct' meteorite, that is, a meteorite type that does not fall on Earth today because its parent body has been consumed by collisions. The meteorites found on Earth today apparently do not give a full representation of the kind of bodies in the asteroid belt ∼500 Myr ago.</p>},
  articleno    = {11851},
  author       = {Schmitz, B. and Yin, Q. Z. and Sanborn, M. E. and Tassinari, M. and Caplan, C. E. and Huss, G. R.},
  issn         = {2041-1723},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Communications},
  title        = {A new type of solar-system material recovered from Ordovician marine limestone},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11851},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2016},
}