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Team Interactions in Specialized Palliative Care Teams: A Qualitative Study

Klarare, Anna ; Hagelin, Carina Lundh ; Fürst, Carl Johan LU and Fossum, Bjoorn (2013) In Journal of Palliative Medicine 16(9). p.1062-1069
Abstract
Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams. Design: Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis. Setting/participants: Participants were... (More)
Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams. Design: Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis. Setting/participants: Participants were recruited from specialized palliative care units in Sweden. The 15 interviewees included 4 men and 11 women. Physcians, nurses, paramedical staff, and social workers were included. Results: Organizational issues like resources and leadership have a great impact on delivery of care. Competence was mirrored in education, collaboration, approach, and support within the team; while communication was described as key to being a team, resolving conflict, and executing palliative care. Conclusion: Communication and communication patterns within the team create the feeling of being a team. Team climate and team performance are significantly impacted by knowledge and trust of competence in colleagues, with other professions, and by the available leadership. Proportions of different health professionals in the team have an impact on the focus and delivery of care. Interprofessional education giving clarity on one's own professional role and knowledge of other professions would most likely benefit patients and family caregivers. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Palliative Medicine
volume
16
issue
9
pages
1062 - 1069
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000324468400013
  • scopus:84884475747
  • pmid:24041291
ISSN
1096-6218
DOI
10.1089/jpm.2012.0622
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0463037-d84b-4300-82d6-2604d86ab693 (old id 4170458)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 13:28:21
date last changed
2020-08-09 04:38:51
@article{f0463037-d84b-4300-82d6-2604d86ab693,
  abstract     = {Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams. Design: Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis. Setting/participants: Participants were recruited from specialized palliative care units in Sweden. The 15 interviewees included 4 men and 11 women. Physcians, nurses, paramedical staff, and social workers were included. Results: Organizational issues like resources and leadership have a great impact on delivery of care. Competence was mirrored in education, collaboration, approach, and support within the team; while communication was described as key to being a team, resolving conflict, and executing palliative care. Conclusion: Communication and communication patterns within the team create the feeling of being a team. Team climate and team performance are significantly impacted by knowledge and trust of competence in colleagues, with other professions, and by the available leadership. Proportions of different health professionals in the team have an impact on the focus and delivery of care. Interprofessional education giving clarity on one's own professional role and knowledge of other professions would most likely benefit patients and family caregivers.},
  author       = {Klarare, Anna and Hagelin, Carina Lundh and Fürst, Carl Johan and Fossum, Bjoorn},
  issn         = {1096-6218},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1062--1069},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Palliative Medicine},
  title        = {Team Interactions in Specialized Palliative Care Teams: A Qualitative Study},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/3391371/4391791.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1089/jpm.2012.0622},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2013},
}