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Child physical abuse – High school students’ mental health and parental relations depending on who perpetrated the abuse

Nilsson, H C; Nordås, ; Priebe, Gisela LU and Svedin, Dick (2017) In Child Abuse and Neglect 70. p.28-38
Abstract

The aim of this study was to contribute to the research of child physical abuse (CPA) by examining if there were any differences in high school students’ mental health (in this study symptoms of depression and anxiety, self-esteem and sense of coherence) and/or, in how they perceive their parents, depending on whether or not they had been subjected to CPA during childhood. In addition, if high school students reported different mental health and/or, relationships with their parents, depending on if their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. A representative national sample of high school students (N = 3288, data collected 2009) participated in the study. Participants completed the following: questions about CPA... (More)

The aim of this study was to contribute to the research of child physical abuse (CPA) by examining if there were any differences in high school students’ mental health (in this study symptoms of depression and anxiety, self-esteem and sense of coherence) and/or, in how they perceive their parents, depending on whether or not they had been subjected to CPA during childhood. In addition, if high school students reported different mental health and/or, relationships with their parents, depending on if their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. A representative national sample of high school students (N = 3288, data collected 2009) participated in the study. Participants completed the following: questions about CPA and alleged perpetrators, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Sense of Coherence Scale and Parental Bonding Instrument. The results showed students who reported experiences of CPA were more likely to report symptoms of mental illness and negative perceptions of their parents’ parenting. However, there were no mental health differences depending on whether their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. Still, there were differences in perceived parenting indicating that mothers’ parenting was perceived as more negative when mothers only or both parents were perpetrators of the abuse than when only fathers were perpetrators.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescence, Child physical abuse, Maltreatment, Mental health, Parent child relations, Sweden
in
Child Abuse and Neglect
volume
70
pages
11 pages
publisher
Pergamon
external identifiers
  • scopus:85019626976
ISSN
0145-2134
DOI
10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.05.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0601b10-d907-428b-a6c3-2cf2a77e8549
date added to LUP
2017-06-22 15:16:14
date last changed
2017-06-23 03:00:03
@article{f0601b10-d907-428b-a6c3-2cf2a77e8549,
  abstract     = {<p>The aim of this study was to contribute to the research of child physical abuse (CPA) by examining if there were any differences in high school students’ mental health (in this study symptoms of depression and anxiety, self-esteem and sense of coherence) and/or, in how they perceive their parents, depending on whether or not they had been subjected to CPA during childhood. In addition, if high school students reported different mental health and/or, relationships with their parents, depending on if their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. A representative national sample of high school students (N = 3288, data collected 2009) participated in the study. Participants completed the following: questions about CPA and alleged perpetrators, the Hopkins Symptom Checklist, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Sense of Coherence Scale and Parental Bonding Instrument. The results showed students who reported experiences of CPA were more likely to report symptoms of mental illness and negative perceptions of their parents’ parenting. However, there were no mental health differences depending on whether their mother, father or both parents were the perpetrators of CPA. Still, there were differences in perceived parenting indicating that mothers’ parenting was perceived as more negative when mothers only or both parents were perpetrators of the abuse than when only fathers were perpetrators.</p>},
  author       = {Nilsson, H C and Nordås,  and Priebe, Gisela and Svedin, Dick},
  issn         = {0145-2134},
  keyword      = {Adolescence,Child physical abuse,Maltreatment,Mental health,Parent child relations,Sweden},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {28--38},
  publisher    = {Pergamon},
  series       = {Child Abuse and Neglect},
  title        = {Child physical abuse – High school students’ mental health and parental relations depending on who perpetrated the abuse},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.05.007},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2017},
}