Advanced

Associations between occupational and social interaction factors and well-being among people with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing in Sweden

Eklund, Mona LU and Tjörnstrand, Carina LU (2020) In Journal of Occupational Science 27(1). p.54-68
Abstract
Research indicates that occupation is important for well-being in people with mental illness, but this has not been extensively studied among those with severe psychiatric disabilities. Social contacts may possibly play a more vital role for them. This study aimed to explore how aspects of occupation and social interaction were related with well-being factors in that group, while controlling for the influence of clinical factors. People with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing (CSH; N = 155) responded to questionnaires addressing occupation, social contacts and well-being aspects, such as subjective health, quality of life, self-mastery, and personal recovery. A comparison group with psychiatric disabilities who... (More)
Research indicates that occupation is important for well-being in people with mental illness, but this has not been extensively studied among those with severe psychiatric disabilities. Social contacts may possibly play a more vital role for them. This study aimed to explore how aspects of occupation and social interaction were related with well-being factors in that group, while controlling for the influence of clinical factors. People with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing (CSH; N = 155) responded to questionnaires addressing occupation, social contacts and well-being aspects, such as subjective health, quality of life, self-mastery, and personal recovery. A comparison group with psychiatric disabilities who lived in an ordinary flat or house and received outreach housing support (N = 111) completed the same instruments. The two groups were compared regarding their pattern of associations between occupation, social contacts, and well-being. Associations between occupation and well-being in the CSH group showed that general satisfaction with everyday occupations in particular was related to all aspects of well-being, whereas activity level and occupational balance were not related to well-being. The relationships were fewer and weaker, in comparison to the group in ordinary housing with outreach support. Indicators of social contacts were basically unrelated to well-being. The study contributes to occupational science by showing that the role of a high activity level for well-being, although important, should not be overemphasized. Future research should focus on narratives to get the voices of people residing in CSH and on exploration of how individually/socially performed occupations are associated with well-being. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Occupational Science
volume
27
issue
1
pages
15 pages
publisher
School of Occupational Therapy
external identifiers
  • scopus:85066973200
ISSN
1442-7591
DOI
10.1080/14427591.2019.1620121
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f0932d28-ecc1-445e-a965-b58c15dc39bf
date added to LUP
2019-06-11 22:43:27
date last changed
2020-12-29 01:20:45
@article{f0932d28-ecc1-445e-a965-b58c15dc39bf,
  abstract     = {Research indicates that occupation is important for well-being in people with mental illness, but this has not been extensively studied among those with severe psychiatric disabilities. Social contacts may possibly play a more vital role for them. This study aimed to explore how aspects of occupation and social interaction were related with well-being factors in that group, while controlling for the influence of clinical factors. People with psychiatric disabilities living in congregate supported housing (CSH; N = 155) responded to questionnaires addressing occupation, social contacts and well-being aspects, such as subjective health, quality of life, self-mastery, and personal recovery. A comparison group with psychiatric disabilities who lived in an ordinary flat or house and received outreach housing support (N = 111) completed the same instruments. The two groups were compared regarding their pattern of associations between occupation, social contacts, and well-being. Associations between occupation and well-being in the CSH group showed that general satisfaction with everyday occupations in particular was related to all aspects of well-being, whereas activity level and occupational balance were not related to well-being. The relationships were fewer and weaker, in comparison to the group in ordinary housing with outreach support. Indicators of social contacts were basically unrelated to well-being. The study contributes to occupational science by showing that the role of a high activity level for well-being, although important, should not be overemphasized. Future research should focus on narratives to get the voices of people residing in CSH and on exploration of how individually/socially performed occupations are associated with well-being.},
  author       = {Eklund, Mona and Tjörnstrand, Carina},
  issn         = {1442-7591},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {54--68},
  publisher    = {School of Occupational Therapy},
  series       = {Journal of Occupational Science},
  title        = {Associations between occupational and social interaction factors and well-being among people with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing in Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2019.1620121},
  doi          = {10.1080/14427591.2019.1620121},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2020},
}