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Associations between self-injury and involvement in cyberbullying among mentally distressed adolescents in Scania, Sweden

Fridh, Maria LU ; Lindström, Martin LU and Rosvall, Maria LU (2018) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Abstract

Aims: To investigate associations between self-injury and involvement in cyberbullying as a bully, victim or bully-victim among mentally distressed adolescents. Methods: Data from the public health survey of children and adolescents in Scania, Sweden 2016 were used. A questionnaire was answered anonymously in school by 9143 students in 9th grade compulsory school (response rate 77%) and 7949 students in 2nd grade of upper secondary school (response rate 73%). Students with past year (broadly defined) mental distress at least 2 weeks in a row (33% of boys and 63% of girls) were asked if they had performed self-injury (i.e. cut, superficially cut or otherwise injured themselves) past year, and those with data on self-injury and... (More)

Aims: To investigate associations between self-injury and involvement in cyberbullying as a bully, victim or bully-victim among mentally distressed adolescents. Methods: Data from the public health survey of children and adolescents in Scania, Sweden 2016 were used. A questionnaire was answered anonymously in school by 9143 students in 9th grade compulsory school (response rate 77%) and 7949 students in 2nd grade of upper secondary school (response rate 73%). Students with past year (broadly defined) mental distress at least 2 weeks in a row (33% of boys and 63% of girls) were asked if they had performed self-injury (i.e. cut, superficially cut or otherwise injured themselves) past year, and those with data on self-injury and cyberbullying were included in the present study (n=6841). Associations between self-injury and cyberbullying were investigated by multiadjusted logistic regression analysis. Results: Among mentally distressed students, self-injury was reported by 11.7% of boys and 25.9% of girls. Age-adjusted analysis showed increasingly higher odds of self-injury among cyberbullies, cybervictims and cyberbully-victims, using non-involved as reference group (OR boys: 1.8, 2.3, 3.0; girls: 2.1, 3.2, 4.8). Associations weakened after adjustment for several potential confounders but remained significant for all cyberbullying groups except male cyberbullies, among whom significance was lost after adjustment for smoking, alcohol and narcotics. Conclusions: Peer victimization in cyber space is associated with self-injury, especially among victims and bully-victims. Decreasing peer victimization is a priority, and school and health professionals need to be aware of the associations between cyberbullying and self-injury among mentally distressed adolescents.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
adolescent, bully, bully-victim, cyberbullying, Self-injury, subjective health complaint, Sweden, victim
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85047932929
ISSN
1403-4948
DOI
10.1177/1403494818779321
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f270fc90-5b25-4a50-aba4-2214c844e1ac
date added to LUP
2018-06-13 15:50:23
date last changed
2018-06-14 03:00:07
@article{f270fc90-5b25-4a50-aba4-2214c844e1ac,
  abstract     = {<p>Aims: To investigate associations between self-injury and involvement in cyberbullying as a bully, victim or bully-victim among mentally distressed adolescents. Methods: Data from the public health survey of children and adolescents in Scania, Sweden 2016 were used. A questionnaire was answered anonymously in school by 9143 students in 9th grade compulsory school (response rate 77%) and 7949 students in 2nd grade of upper secondary school (response rate 73%). Students with past year (broadly defined) mental distress at least 2 weeks in a row (33% of boys and 63% of girls) were asked if they had performed self-injury (i.e. cut, superficially cut or otherwise injured themselves) past year, and those with data on self-injury and cyberbullying were included in the present study (n=6841). Associations between self-injury and cyberbullying were investigated by multiadjusted logistic regression analysis. Results: Among mentally distressed students, self-injury was reported by 11.7% of boys and 25.9% of girls. Age-adjusted analysis showed increasingly higher odds of self-injury among cyberbullies, cybervictims and cyberbully-victims, using non-involved as reference group (OR boys: 1.8, 2.3, 3.0; girls: 2.1, 3.2, 4.8). Associations weakened after adjustment for several potential confounders but remained significant for all cyberbullying groups except male cyberbullies, among whom significance was lost after adjustment for smoking, alcohol and narcotics. Conclusions: Peer victimization in cyber space is associated with self-injury, especially among victims and bully-victims. Decreasing peer victimization is a priority, and school and health professionals need to be aware of the associations between cyberbullying and self-injury among mentally distressed adolescents.</p>},
  author       = {Fridh, Maria and Lindström, Martin and Rosvall, Maria},
  issn         = {1403-4948},
  keyword      = {adolescent,bully,bully-victim,cyberbullying,Self-injury,subjective health complaint,Sweden,victim},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Associations between self-injury and involvement in cyberbullying among mentally distressed adolescents in Scania, Sweden},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1403494818779321},
  year         = {2018},
}