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An Evaluation of Measures to Reduce Personal Fear of Wolves

Johansson, Maria LU and Frank, Jens (2015)
Abstract (Swedish)
Large carnivore populations, such as wolf (Canis lupus) and brown bear (Ursus arctos), have during the last decades increased in Scandinavia. This has led to an intensified debate about the presence of large carnivores as well as about large carnivore policy and management. To some people large carnivores are associated with positive feelings such as interest and joy. To others the presence of large carnivores is stressful, and a concern for the perceived safety. This fear may negatively influence everyday life, especially among people in the countryside, and to people who fear large carnivores, the presence of these animals in their vicinity constitutes an environmental stressor that may affect well-being and health.
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Large carnivore populations, such as wolf (Canis lupus) and brown bear (Ursus arctos), have during the last decades increased in Scandinavia. This has led to an intensified debate about the presence of large carnivores as well as about large carnivore policy and management. To some people large carnivores are associated with positive feelings such as interest and joy. To others the presence of large carnivores is stressful, and a concern for the perceived safety. This fear may negatively influence everyday life, especially among people in the countryside, and to people who fear large carnivores, the presence of these animals in their vicinity constitutes an environmental stressor that may affect well-being and health.
Information is commonly introduced in response to public fear of large carnivores. The rare evaluations of informational and educational programmes in this context show however mixed results with regard to fear-related variables. In situations with large carnivores close to human settlements, additional management interventions may also be introduced. So called primary repellents use disruptive stimuli, which are stimuli that disrupt predatory behaviors by causing a “fright” or “startle” response. Sonic deterrents have the advantage of being cheap, easy to carry and not restricted by any current legislation. Furthermore they have no proven potential to harm the user or the carnivore involved. The present project aimed to i) advance the psychological theory of human fear of large carnivores and ii) evaluate if two different measures, factual information and an ultra-sonic scaring device would influence antecedents of wolf fear as well as the self-reported feeling of fear. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
publisher
Forskningsrådet Formas
ISBN
dnr: 250-2008-402
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
f2b87994-a83c-48d2-aa3f-8be63fc92105
alternative location
http://mpe.arkitektur.lth.se/fileadmin/miljopsykologi/English_scientific_summary_150330mj.pdf
date added to LUP
2017-02-17 22:20:31
date last changed
2017-11-14 09:53:27
@techreport{f2b87994-a83c-48d2-aa3f-8be63fc92105,
  abstract     = {Large carnivore populations, such as wolf (Canis lupus) and brown bear (Ursus arctos), have during the last decades increased in Scandinavia. This has led to an intensified debate about the presence of large carnivores as well as about large carnivore policy and management. To some people large carnivores are associated with positive feelings such as interest and joy. To others the presence of large carnivores is stressful, and a concern for the perceived safety. This fear may negatively influence everyday life, especially among people in the countryside, and to people who fear large carnivores, the presence of these animals in their vicinity constitutes an environmental stressor that may affect well-being and health.<br/>Information is commonly introduced in response to public fear of large carnivores. The rare evaluations of informational and educational programmes in this context show however mixed results with regard to fear-related variables. In situations with large carnivores close to human settlements, additional management interventions may also be introduced. So called primary repellents use disruptive stimuli, which are stimuli that disrupt predatory behaviors by causing a “fright” or “startle” response. Sonic deterrents have the advantage of being cheap, easy to carry and not restricted by any current legislation. Furthermore they have no proven potential to harm the user or the carnivore involved. The present project aimed to i) advance the psychological theory of human fear of large carnivores and ii) evaluate if two different measures, factual information and an ultra-sonic scaring device would influence antecedents of wolf fear as well as the self-reported feeling of fear.},
  author       = {Johansson, Maria and Frank, Jens },
  institution  = {Forskningsrådet Formas},
  isbn         = {dnr: 250-2008-402},
  language     = {swe},
  month        = {03},
  title        = {An Evaluation of Measures to Reduce Personal Fear of Wolves},
  year         = {2015},
}