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A daytime nap does not increase mnemonic discrimination ability

Davidson, Per LU ; Jönsson, Peter LU and Johansson, Mikael LU (2020) In Journal of Sleep Research
Abstract
It has been proposed that sleep readies the brain for novel learning, and previous work has shown that sleep loss impairs the ability to encode new memories. In the present study, we examined if a daytime nap would increase mnemonic discrimination (MD) performance. MD is the ability to differentiate between memories that are similar but not identical. Participants performed the Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST) twice, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. The goal of this task is to distinguish stimuli that have been seen before from novel stimuli that are similar but not identical. After the morning MST, participants were randomly allocated into either a sleep or a wake group. The sleep group had a 2‐hr nap opportunity, whereas the... (More)
It has been proposed that sleep readies the brain for novel learning, and previous work has shown that sleep loss impairs the ability to encode new memories. In the present study, we examined if a daytime nap would increase mnemonic discrimination (MD) performance. MD is the ability to differentiate between memories that are similar but not identical. Participants performed the Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST) twice, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. The goal of this task is to distinguish stimuli that have been seen before from novel stimuli that are similar but not identical. After the morning MST, participants were randomly allocated into either a sleep or a wake group. The sleep group had a 2‐hr nap opportunity, whereas the wake group spent a similar amount of time passively resting. All participants then performed a second MST in the afternoon with a novel set of images. Results did not show any support for increased MD ability after a nap. There was, however, a correlation showing that an increase in sleepiness between sessions predicted a decrease in MD performance. Future work must systematically examine how strong sleep manipulations that are needed for sleep to have an effect on encoding ability, as well as which kind of memory tasks that are sensitive to sleep manipulations. More knowledge about the relationship between sleep and the ability to differentiate similar memories from each other is important because impaired MD ability has previously been reported in various groups in which sleep disturbances are also common. (Less)
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author
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publication status
epub
subject
in
Journal of Sleep Research
article number
e13128
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85087174785
  • pmid:32557911
ISSN
1365-2869
DOI
10.1111/jsr.13128
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f44f0ca7-18bf-4b10-9f6c-6809fc5f6e17
date added to LUP
2020-05-25 15:38:57
date last changed
2020-10-07 06:59:07
@article{f44f0ca7-18bf-4b10-9f6c-6809fc5f6e17,
  abstract     = {It has been proposed that sleep readies the brain for novel learning, and previous work has shown that sleep loss impairs the ability to encode new memories. In the present study, we examined if a daytime nap would increase mnemonic discrimination (MD) performance. MD is the ability to differentiate between memories that are similar but not identical. Participants performed the Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST) twice, once in the morning and once in the afternoon. The goal of this task is to distinguish stimuli that have been seen before from novel stimuli that are similar but not identical. After the morning MST, participants were randomly allocated into either a sleep or a wake group. The sleep group had a 2‐hr nap opportunity, whereas the wake group spent a similar amount of time passively resting. All participants then performed a second MST in the afternoon with a novel set of images. Results did not show any support for increased MD ability after a nap. There was, however, a correlation showing that an increase in sleepiness between sessions predicted a decrease in MD performance. Future work must systematically examine how strong sleep manipulations that are needed for sleep to have an effect on encoding ability, as well as which kind of memory tasks that are sensitive to sleep manipulations. More knowledge about the relationship between sleep and the ability to differentiate similar memories from each other is important because impaired MD ability has previously been reported in various groups in which sleep disturbances are also common.},
  author       = {Davidson, Per and Jönsson, Peter and Johansson, Mikael},
  issn         = {1365-2869},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Sleep Research},
  title        = {A daytime nap does not increase mnemonic discrimination ability},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13128},
  doi          = {10.1111/jsr.13128},
  year         = {2020},
}