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Workforce participation and activities in Parkinson's disease patients receiving device-aided therapy

Sahlström, T.; Eklund, M. LU ; Timpka, J. LU ; Henriksen, T.; Nyholm, D. and Odin, P. LU (2018) In Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Abstract

Objectives: Many countries have an aging population, and it is thus likely that Parkinson's disease (PD) will become an increasing health problem. It is important to ensure this group can use their resources in the best way possible, including remaining in the work market. This study aimed to investigate workforce participation and daily activities among patients with PD receiving device-aided therapy to provide new knowledge that may be used to inform decisions about these therapy options. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive quantitative pilot study, including 67 patients with PD from 3 centers in Sweden and Denmark. Included patients were younger than 67 years at the time of introduction of device-aided... (More)

Objectives: Many countries have an aging population, and it is thus likely that Parkinson's disease (PD) will become an increasing health problem. It is important to ensure this group can use their resources in the best way possible, including remaining in the work market. This study aimed to investigate workforce participation and daily activities among patients with PD receiving device-aided therapy to provide new knowledge that may be used to inform decisions about these therapy options. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive quantitative pilot study, including 67 patients with PD from 3 centers in Sweden and Denmark. Included patients were younger than 67 years at the time of introduction of device-aided therapy. Eligible patients were identified by the Swedish national Parkinson patient registry or by the treating neurologist. Quantitative interviews were made by telephone. Results: A majority of the patients could perform the same, or more, amount of activities approximately 5 years after the introduction of device-aided therapy. A small number of patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) and levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) were able to increase their work capacity within 1 year of initiating device-aided therapy and a remarkably high share could still work at the end-point of this study, approximately 15 years since the diagnosis of PD. Conclusions: Device-aided therapy may sustain or increase daily activities and workforce participation in patients with PD who have not yet reached retirement age. There is need for prospective studies, both quantitative and qualitative, to confirm these results.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Activity, Device-aided therapy, Parkinson's disease, Quality of life, Work
in
Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044178223
ISSN
0001-6314
DOI
10.1111/ane.12929
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f4a7759d-bcd3-4147-be78-5ed46a68caef
date added to LUP
2018-04-09 13:41:38
date last changed
2018-07-10 03:00:34
@article{f4a7759d-bcd3-4147-be78-5ed46a68caef,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: Many countries have an aging population, and it is thus likely that Parkinson's disease (PD) will become an increasing health problem. It is important to ensure this group can use their resources in the best way possible, including remaining in the work market. This study aimed to investigate workforce participation and daily activities among patients with PD receiving device-aided therapy to provide new knowledge that may be used to inform decisions about these therapy options. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive quantitative pilot study, including 67 patients with PD from 3 centers in Sweden and Denmark. Included patients were younger than 67 years at the time of introduction of device-aided therapy. Eligible patients were identified by the Swedish national Parkinson patient registry or by the treating neurologist. Quantitative interviews were made by telephone. Results: A majority of the patients could perform the same, or more, amount of activities approximately 5 years after the introduction of device-aided therapy. A small number of patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS) and levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) were able to increase their work capacity within 1 year of initiating device-aided therapy and a remarkably high share could still work at the end-point of this study, approximately 15 years since the diagnosis of PD. Conclusions: Device-aided therapy may sustain or increase daily activities and workforce participation in patients with PD who have not yet reached retirement age. There is need for prospective studies, both quantitative and qualitative, to confirm these results.</p>},
  author       = {Sahlström, T. and Eklund, M. and Timpka, J. and Henriksen, T. and Nyholm, D. and Odin, P.},
  issn         = {0001-6314},
  keyword      = {Activity,Device-aided therapy,Parkinson's disease,Quality of life,Work},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Neurologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Workforce participation and activities in Parkinson's disease patients receiving device-aided therapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ane.12929},
  year         = {2018},
}