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Physicochemical and drug delivery aspects of lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles: A case study of intravenously administered propofol

Johnsson, Markus LU ; Barauskas, Justas LU ; Norlin, Andreas and Tiberg, Fredrik LU (2006) In Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 6(9-10). p.3017-3024
Abstract
Liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNP) formed through lipid self-assembly have a range of attractive properties as in vivo drug delivery carriers. In particular they offer: a wide solubilization spectrum, and consequently high drug payloads; effective encapsulation; stabilization and protection of sensitive drug substances. Here we present basic physicochemical features of non-lamellar LCNP systems with a focus on intravenous drug applications. This is exemplified by the formulation properties and in vivo behavior using the drug substance propofol; a well-known anesthetic agent currently used in clinical practice in the form of a stable emulsion. In order to appraise the drug delivery features of the LCNP system the current study was... (More)
Liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNP) formed through lipid self-assembly have a range of attractive properties as in vivo drug delivery carriers. In particular they offer: a wide solubilization spectrum, and consequently high drug payloads; effective encapsulation; stabilization and protection of sensitive drug substances. Here we present basic physicochemical features of non-lamellar LCNP systems with a focus on intravenous drug applications. This is exemplified by the formulation properties and in vivo behavior using the drug substance propofol; a well-known anesthetic agent currently used in clinical practice in the form of a stable emulsion. In order to appraise the drug delivery features of the LCNP system the current study was carried out with a marketed propofol emulsion product as reference. In this comparison the propofol-LCNP formulation shows several useful features including: higher drug-loading capacity, lower fat-load, excellent stability, modified pharmacokinetics, and an indication of increased effect duration. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
drug delivery, emulsion, Cubosome (R), nanoparticle, liquid crystal, intravenous, injection, propofol, anesthesia
in
Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
volume
6
issue
9-10
pages
3017 - 3024
publisher
American Scientific Publishers
external identifiers
  • wos:000240865900046
  • scopus:33750058273
ISSN
1533-4880
DOI
10.1166/jnn.2006.402
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f85c89c9-a5a4-4baa-8fd2-1a8a9ab28237 (old id 389512)
date added to LUP
2007-10-07 11:39:39
date last changed
2019-08-14 01:53:12
@article{f85c89c9-a5a4-4baa-8fd2-1a8a9ab28237,
  abstract     = {Liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNP) formed through lipid self-assembly have a range of attractive properties as in vivo drug delivery carriers. In particular they offer: a wide solubilization spectrum, and consequently high drug payloads; effective encapsulation; stabilization and protection of sensitive drug substances. Here we present basic physicochemical features of non-lamellar LCNP systems with a focus on intravenous drug applications. This is exemplified by the formulation properties and in vivo behavior using the drug substance propofol; a well-known anesthetic agent currently used in clinical practice in the form of a stable emulsion. In order to appraise the drug delivery features of the LCNP system the current study was carried out with a marketed propofol emulsion product as reference. In this comparison the propofol-LCNP formulation shows several useful features including: higher drug-loading capacity, lower fat-load, excellent stability, modified pharmacokinetics, and an indication of increased effect duration.},
  author       = {Johnsson, Markus and Barauskas, Justas and Norlin, Andreas and Tiberg, Fredrik},
  issn         = {1533-4880},
  keyword      = {drug delivery,emulsion,Cubosome (R),nanoparticle,liquid crystal,intravenous,injection,propofol,anesthesia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9-10},
  pages        = {3017--3024},
  publisher    = {American Scientific Publishers},
  series       = {Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology},
  title        = {Physicochemical and drug delivery aspects of lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles: A case study of intravenously administered propofol},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1166/jnn.2006.402},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2006},
}