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Familial risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke : a large-scale study of the Swedish population

Sundquist, Kristina LU ; Li, Xinjun LU and Hemminki, Kari LU (2006) In Stroke 37(7). p.73-1668
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies of familial risks have often combined ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke even though it seems unlikely that these 2 very different pathological conditions are under the same genetic influence. This study is the first to investigate the concordant (same subtype) and disconcordant (different subtype) association between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

METHODS: Data of first hospitalization for stroke were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register during the study period 1987 to 2001. All individuals born in Sweden from 1932 onwards were included and linked to their siblings. Risks were calculated as standardized incidence ratios and compared with individuals without affected siblings.... (More)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies of familial risks have often combined ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke even though it seems unlikely that these 2 very different pathological conditions are under the same genetic influence. This study is the first to investigate the concordant (same subtype) and disconcordant (different subtype) association between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

METHODS: Data of first hospitalization for stroke were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register during the study period 1987 to 2001. All individuals born in Sweden from 1932 onwards were included and linked to their siblings. Risks were calculated as standardized incidence ratios and compared with individuals without affected siblings. Results were standardized for age, gender, geographical region and socioeconomic status.

RESULTS: Ischemic stroke (n=25,630) was associated only with ischemic stroke (n=7961), which was also the case for hemorrhagic stroke. The statistically significant standardized incidence ratios were 2.14 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.74) and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.21 to 2.75), respectively. For discordant subtypes of stroke no significant associations were found.

CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are not under the same genetic influence. However, further studies of the human genome are needed in order to identify the specific genes that play roles in the pathogenesis of common subtypes of stroke.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Brain Ischemia/epidemiology, Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology, Child, Child, Preschool, Databases, Factual, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, Occupations/statistics & numerical data, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Siblings, Sweden/epidemiology
in
Stroke
volume
37
issue
7
pages
6 pages
publisher
American Heart Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:16741164
ISSN
1524-4628
DOI
10.1161/01.STR.0000227409.59195.d1
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
fa1e5781-fc72-467d-a7f5-62113bbbd514
date added to LUP
2019-01-30 11:12:36
date last changed
2019-10-31 04:01:22
@article{fa1e5781-fc72-467d-a7f5-62113bbbd514,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies of familial risks have often combined ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke even though it seems unlikely that these 2 very different pathological conditions are under the same genetic influence. This study is the first to investigate the concordant (same subtype) and disconcordant (different subtype) association between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.</p><p>METHODS: Data of first hospitalization for stroke were obtained from the Hospital Discharge Register during the study period 1987 to 2001. All individuals born in Sweden from 1932 onwards were included and linked to their siblings. Risks were calculated as standardized incidence ratios and compared with individuals without affected siblings. Results were standardized for age, gender, geographical region and socioeconomic status.</p><p>RESULTS: Ischemic stroke (n=25,630) was associated only with ischemic stroke (n=7961), which was also the case for hemorrhagic stroke. The statistically significant standardized incidence ratios were 2.14 (95% CI, 1.21 to 3.74) and 1.82 (95% CI, 1.21 to 2.75), respectively. For discordant subtypes of stroke no significant associations were found.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are not under the same genetic influence. However, further studies of the human genome are needed in order to identify the specific genes that play roles in the pathogenesis of common subtypes of stroke.</p>},
  author       = {Sundquist, Kristina and Li, Xinjun and Hemminki, Kari},
  issn         = {1524-4628},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {73--1668},
  publisher    = {American Heart Association},
  series       = {Stroke},
  title        = {Familial risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke : a large-scale study of the Swedish population},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.STR.0000227409.59195.d1},
  doi          = {10.1161/01.STR.0000227409.59195.d1},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2006},
}